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I have a table with 3 fields:

id
note
created_at

Is there a way in the SQL language especially Postgres that I can select the value of the last note without having to LIMIT 1?

Normal query:

select note from table order by created_at desc limit 1

I'm interested in something avoiding the limit since I'll need it as a subquery.

share|improve this question
    
"I'm interested in something avoiding the limit since I'll need it as a subquery." That's a silly reason to avoid using a useful feature. What's the real reason? What is your actual problem? Post your code and the error you get. What are your requirements and concerns? Explain why LIMIT doesn't satisfy your requirements. –  Mark Byers Aug 24 '12 at 22:18
    
It's related to this question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12112990/… –  Gigi Contra Aug 24 '12 at 22:19
    
Ain't no such thing as "Postgre" - I fixed it. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 25 '12 at 0:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your id column is an autoincrementing primary key field, it's pretty easy. This assumes the latest note has the highest id. (That might not be true; only you know that!)

select *
  from note
 where id = (select max(id) from note)

It's here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/7478a/1/0 for MySQL and here http://sqlfiddle.com/#!1/6597d/1/0 for postgreSQL. Same SQL.

If your id column isn't set up so the latest note has the highest id, but still is a primary key (that is, still has unique values in each row), it's a little harder. We have to disambiguate identical dates; we'll do this by choosing, arbitrarily, the highest id.

select *
  from note
  where id = (
              select max(id)
                from note where created_at = 
                   (select max(created_at) 
                      from note
                   )
              )

Here's an example: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/1f802/4/0 for MySQL. Here it is for postgreSQL (the SQL is the same, yay!) http://sqlfiddle.com/#!1/bca8c/1/0

Another possibility: maybe you want both notes shown together in one row if they were both created at the same exact time. Again, only you know that.

select group_concat(note separator '; ') 
  from note 
 where created_at = (select max(created_at) from note)

In postgreSQL 9+, it's

 select string_agg(note, '; ') 
   from note 
  where created_at = (select max(created_at) from note)

If you do have the possibility for duplicate created_at times and duplicate id values, and you don't want the group_concat effect, you are unfortunately stuck with LIMIT.

share|improve this answer
    
+ for the effort :) –  Gigi Contra Aug 24 '12 at 23:35
    
As to your last statement: Well, there are window functions for PostgreSQL and the substitute with variables for MySQL. –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 25 '12 at 14:41

Simple version with EXISTS semi-join:

SELECT note FROM tbl t
WHERE  NOT EXISTS
    (SELECT 1 FROM tbl t1 WHERE t1.created_at > t.created_at);

"Find a note where no other note was created later."

This shares the weakness of @Hogan's version that it can return multiple rows if created_at is not UNIQUE - like @Ollie already pointed out. Unlike @Hogan's query (max() is only defined for simple types) this one can be improved easily:

Compare row types

SELECT note FROM tbl t
WHERE  NOT EXISTS
   (SELECT 1 FROM tbl t1
    WHERE  (t1.created_at, t1.id) > (t.created_at, t.id));

Assuming you want the greatest id in case of a tie with created_at, and id is the primary key, therefore unique. This works in PostgreSQL and MySQL.

SQL Fiddle.

Window function

The same can be achieved with a window function in PostgreSQL:

SELECT note
FROM  (
    SELECT note, row_number() OVER (ORDER BY created_at DESC, id DESC) AS rn
    FROM   tbl t 
    ) x
WHERE  rn = 1;

MySQL lacks support for window functions. You can substitute with a variable like this:

SELECT note
FROM  (
    SELECT note, @rownum := @rownum + 1 AS rn
    FROM   tbl t 
         ,(SELECT @rownum := 0) r
    ORDER  BY created_at DESC, id DESC
    ) x
WHERE  rn = 1;

(SELECT @rownum := 0) r initializes the variable with 0 without an explicit SET command.

SQL Fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer. –  Hogan Aug 25 '12 at 14:41

I'm not 100% on Postgres (actually never used it) but you can get the same effect with something like this - if the created_at is unique ... (or with any column which is unique):

SELECT note FROM table WHERE created_at = (
    SELECT MAX(created_at) FROM table
)
share|improve this answer
    
That's doesn't do the same. It's not guaranteed to return only one row (unless there is a unique contraint on created_at). –  Mark Byers Aug 24 '12 at 22:22
    
@MarkByers - I would have sworn my answer says "if the dates are unique". Did you not read the 2nd line? –  Hogan Aug 24 '12 at 22:23

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