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I'm trying to get used to the "real" prototypal inheritance of JavaScript (ECMAScript 5) but somehow my mind seems to be stuck in the classical inheritance pattern.

I'd like to create a Vector object which performs simple operations such as adding, subtracting etc.

Now there are two scenarios:

  • #1: Adding Vector B "to" Vector A (Vector A gets modified)
  • #2: Adding Vector B "to" Vector B (a new Vector C is created, which is the sum of A and B)

In classical inheritance I'd create an instance method for scenario #1 and a static method for case #2 but it seems like there are no static functions in prototypal inheritance.

So, what's a clean way to realize these two scenarios?

Here's what I've got so far:

var Vector = {

  x: 0,
  y: 0,
  z: 0,

  initialize: function(x,y,z) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.z = z;
    return this;
  },

  add: function(vec) {
    this.x += vec.x;
    this.y += vec.y;
    this.z += vec.z;
    return this;  
  },

  print: function() {
    console.log('x:', this.x, 'y:', this.y, 'z:', this.z);
  }
};

var firstVector = Object.create(Vector).initialize(1,2,3);
var secondVector =  Object.create(Vector).initialize(4,5,6);

firstVector.print();  // Outputs: x:1, y:2, z:3
secondVector.print(); // Outputs: x:4, y:5, z:6

firstVector.add(secondVector); 
firstVector.print(); // Outputs: x:5,y:7,z:9


// What I'm looking for:

var thirdVector = Vector.add(firstVector, secondVector);

Thanks for any advice!

Update:

Here is my attempt to implement a static function using Paul's advice (thanks!):

var vectorPrototype = {
  hello: function() { console.log('hello I am the prototype'); }
};

var Vector = Object.create(vectorPrototype);

Vector.hello = function() { console.log('hello I am the static function'); };

Vector.init = function() {
  return Object.create(vectorPrototype);
}

var vec1 = Vector.init();

vec1.hello(); // says: 'hello I am the prototype'
Vector.hello(); // says: 'hello I am the static function'
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your Vector object is really just the prototype. You can use it with the Object.create function to create your Vector base/sub class. Then stick your static properties on your newly created Vector class. See here: http://jsfiddle.net/agYNc/1/

var vectorPrototype = {

  x: 0,
  y: 0,
  z: 0,

  initialize: function(x,y,z) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.z = z;
    return this;
  },

  add: function(vec) {
    this.x += vec.x;
    this.y += vec.y;
    this.z += vec.z;
    return this;  
  },

  print: function() {
    console.log('x:', this.x, 'y:', this.y, 'z:', this.z);
  }
};

//create your base Vector type
var Vector = Object.create( vectorPrototype );


//Your static functions here
Vector.staticFunction = function ( vec1, vec2 ) {};


var firstVector = Object.create(Vector).initialize(1,2,3);
var secondVector =  Object.create(Vector).initialize(4,5,6);

firstVector.print();  // Outputs: x:1, y:2, z:3
secondVector.print(); // Outputs: x:4, y:5, z:6

firstVector.add(secondVector); 
firstVector.print(); // Outputs: x:5,y:7,z:9​

Here is a good example of using Object.create with inheritance, static and instance properties. https://github.com/webadvanced/takeCommand/blob/master/src/takeCommand.module.js

share|improve this answer
    
hi, thank you very much for your advice and the link! I tried to implement a static function (see the update in my question), is this the 'right' way to go? –  sled Aug 25 '12 at 12:32
    
Yes, looks good to me :) –  Paul Aug 25 '12 at 17:36
    
In similar case, my static method is allready attached to "prototype"(vectorPrototype) can I inherit it down to sublcass(Vector) or should I defined it at my subclass to? Thanks –  Alan Kis Oct 27 '13 at 0:31
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