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I have a module defined as follows:

define(
    ['backbone', 'View/Sidebar', 'View/ControlBar'],
    function() {
        ...
    }
);

In that module there is a method called loadView, which assigns a variable as follows:

loadView: function(name, bootstrap_function, into) {
    var _class  = require('View/'+name);
    ...
}

So, we can see that both View/Sidebar and View/ControlBar are being loaded by the define call (first arg). When I use require('Sidebar'), I get no errors, yet if I use require('ControlBar') I do get the notorious:

Error: Module name "View/ControlBar" has not been loaded yet for context: _

(http://requirejs.org/docs/errors.html#notloaded)

I have re-written, copied and pasted, verified that it is loaded in Firebug and so on but cannot for the life of me work out why I am getting this error 100% of the time.

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I don't see anything wrong from the code you have posted. Is it possible to post the View/ControlBar, View/Sidebar as well? Maybe there is a circular reference in View/ControlBar requiring this module? –  Cristi Mihai Aug 29 '12 at 10:04
    
Unfortunately since I posted this the code has moved on considerably and I'm not sure which commits were relevant here. It is entirely possible that there was a circular reference, however, so maybe that did it. Thanks. –  GTF Aug 29 '12 at 10:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think this has something to do with how the arguments are called for require. I have found that the following throws an error

define(
    ['mymodule1', 'mymodule2'],
    function(mod1, mod2) {
        ...
        var x = require('mymodule2');
        ...
    }
);

Whereas the following does not:

define(
    ['mymodule1', 'mymodule2'],
    function() {
        ...
        var x = require('mymodule2');
        ...
    }
);

The difference is whether or not the loaded modules are declared as arguments to the function or not. At least this is the way that it seems to me, it does not, however, make much sense...

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