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I currently get my session from the globalasax as follows...

public class MvcApplication : HttpApplication
{
    public static readonly ISessionFactory SessionFactory =                                        NHibernateHelper.CreateSessionFactory();

    public MvcApplication()
    {
        BeginRequest += delegate
                            {
                                if (!HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.AbsolutePath.StartsWith("/_cassette/"))
                                {
                                    CurrentSession = SessionFactory.OpenSession();
                                    CurrentSession.FlushMode = FlushMode.Auto;
                                }
                            };
        EndRequest += delegate
                        {
                            if (CurrentSession != null)
                            {
                                CurrentSession.Flush();
                                CurrentSession.Dispose();
                            }
                        };
    }

    public static ISession CurrentSession
    {
        get { return (ISession) HttpContext.Current.Items["current.session"]; }
        set { HttpContext.Current.Items["current.session"] = value; }

I was looking at the Sharp Architecture Transaction attribute and a similar one http://weblogs.asp.net/srkirkland/archive/2009/09/03/asp-net-mvc-transaction-attribute-using-nhibernate.aspx but whats the best way of handling sessions in an MVC4 project to make use of none-implicit transactions ala http://nhprof.com/Learn/Alerts/DoNotUseImplicitTransactions

I can easily wrap everything by adding the transaction/commit to the begin request/end request but the attribute method seems cleaner (actually handles errors); or should I be using a filter now?

What is the best practice for MVC4 with NHibernate?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your current session handling has one serious problem (been there done that ;)). CurrentSession is static and hence it is shared among all concurrent requests. NHibernate's ISession is NOT thread safe (unlike ISessionFactory which IS thread safe).

NHibernate offers session contextes into which the session can be bound and after which the bound session can be acquired from session factory (.GetCurrentSession() -method). To be able to use CurrentSessionContext like in the next example you need to tell NHibernate which session context to use. For web applications WebSessionContext is good choice.

When I'm using MVC I write an action filter which takes care of the session handling. Here is an example (written for MVC 2):

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class TransactionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public TransactionAttribute()
    {
        Order = 100;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        CurrentSessionContext.Bind(NHibernateManager.SessionFactory.OpenSession());
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        var session = CurrentSessionContext.Unbind(NHibernateManager.SessionFactory);
        session.Close();
        session.Dispose();
    }
}

It shouldn't be too much of a problem to add transaction management also into the same filter. In OnActionExecuting-method you could open transaction with ISession's .BeginTransaction() and in OnActionExecuted you get the current transaction from ISession's Transaction-property which can then be committed and disposed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks thats really helpful :) – Chris McKee Aug 25 '12 at 9:31
    
Whipped out my NHibernate3 cookbook (forgot about it tbh) and cleaned out my crap... now for a fun attach-an-attribute session. Will be nice to get rid of the implicit transaction error on nhprof :D – Chris McKee Aug 25 '12 at 21:52

There's another way to implement the "Session per request pattern" - httpModule.

public class NHibernateModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        context.BeginRequest += context_BeginRequest;
        context.EndRequest += context_EndRequest;
    }

    private static void context_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //use my session manager
        ISession session = SessionManager.Instance.OpenSession();
        CurrentSessionContext.Bind(session);
    }

    private static void context_EndRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ISessionFactory sessionFactory = SessionManager.Instance.SessionFactory;
        ISession session = CurrentSessionContext.Unbind(sessionFactory);

        if (session == null) return;
        if (session.Transaction != null)
        {
            if (session.Transaction.IsActive)
            {
                //if there is an active session, commit it
                session.Transaction.Commit();
            }
            else
            {
                //
                session.Transaction.Rollback();
            }
        }

        session.Close();
    }


<configuration>

   <!-- IIS 6 -->
    <system.web>
         <httpModules>
            <add name="NHibernateModule" type="NHibernateModule"/>
        </httpModules>
     </system.web>
     <!-- IIS 7 and Cassini. -->
    <system.webServer>
         <modules>
            <add name="NHibernateModule" type="NHibernateModule"/>
        </modules>
    </system.webServer>
</configuration>

ActionFilterAttribute way has the question: how it will behave with a few actions in one HTTP request?

This pattern suggests that one NHibernate session be opened per HTTP request.

share|improve this answer
    
I've gone with a modified version of the examples in the NH3 Cookbook (Creating a ASP.NET MVC session action filter + Creating a ASP.NET MVC transaction action filter) which consists of opening the session and binding to the CurrentSessionContext on begin request; and unbind + session dispose on the end request. Transaction + session is handed in the attribute; creating/disposing on request. – Chris McKee Aug 26 '12 at 22:02
    
The disadvantage of this is creating a session for each request, even if you don't need one in some specific action. – Guillermo Gutiérrez Sep 12 '12 at 15:40
    
@guillegr123 I think that it is not disadvantage, but on the contrary, every request has it own session and it can warn from a lot of troubles. If you need session for a few requests, it's better to use second level cache – Anton Sep 13 '12 at 9:53
    
But what if I don't need nor session nor transaction for some MVC action? I know that Session is a lightweight object, but still creating something I don't need for every request seems a redundant operation. – JustAMartin Jan 8 '13 at 10:19
    
Hey @Anton , why are you doing a rollback if there isn't an active session? – Juddling Feb 26 '13 at 13:18

Following up to Ultor's answer, plus Ayende's "Refactoring toward frictionless & odorless code: What about transactions?" article, and, finally, because I have already set the dependency resolver of the application in Application_Start using the following:

DependencyResolver.SetResolver(new MyDependencyResolver())

I changed the TransactionAttribute class to be as follows:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class SessionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute {
    static readonly ISessionFactory SessionFactory = BuildSessionFactory();

    static ISessionFactory BuildSessionFactory() {
        return (ISessionFactory) DependencyResolver.Current.GetService(typeof (ISessionFactory));
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext) {
        var sessionController = filterContext.Controller as SessionController;

        if (sessionController == null)
            return;
        if (sessionController.NHibernateSession == null) {
            sessionController.NHibernateSession = SessionFactory.OpenSession();
        }
        sessionController.NHibernateSession.BeginTransaction();
        CurrentSessionContext.Bind(sessionController.NHibernateSession);
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext) {
        var sessionController = filterContext.Controller as SessionController;

        if (sessionController == null) return;

        var session = CurrentSessionContext.Unbind(SessionFactory);
        if (session == null) return;
        if (session.Transaction != null) {
            if (!session.Transaction.IsActive) return;

            if (filterContext.Exception != null)
                session.Transaction.Rollback();
            else
                session.Transaction.Commit();
        }
        session.Close();
        session.Dispose();
    }
}

And the base controller defined as such:

public class SessionController : Controller {
    public ISession NHibernateSession { get; set; }
}

Now, persistence in my controller becomes as easy as:

[HttpGet, Session]
public ActionResult CreateOrUpdate(Guid id = new Guid()) {
    var company = GetCompany(id);
    if (company == null) throw new HttpException(404, "Not Found");
    return View(company);
}

[HttpPost, ValidateAntiForgeryToken, Session] 
public ActionResult CreateOrUpdate(Company passedInCompany) {
    var company = NHibernateSession.Get<Company>(passedInCompany.Id);
    if (company == null) throw new HttpException(404, "Not Found");
    UpdateModel(company);
    if (ModelState.IsValid) {
        NHibernateSession.SaveOrUpdate(company);
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    return View(company);
}

Company GetCompany(Guid id) {
    Company company;
    if (id == Guid.Empty) {
        company = companyBuilder.Create();
    } else {
        company = NHibernateSession.Get<Company>(id);
        NHibernateSession.Flush();
    }
    return company;
}
share|improve this answer

There are some good answers here but my recommendation is to use a dependency inject framework (I like Ninject) to implement session-per-request. This allows you to use constructor injection on the controllers to inject the ISession.

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