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I can find the sum of each row (n/log n-i) and also I can draw its recursive tree but I can't calculate sum of its rows.

T(n)=2T(n/2)+n/logn

T(1) = 1

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Suppose n = 2^k;

We know for harmonic series (euler formula):

Sum[i = 1 to n](1/i) ~= log(n) [n -> infinity]

t(n) = 2t(n/2) + n/log(n)
     = 2(2t(n/4) + n/2/log(n/2)) + n/log(n)
     = 4t(n/4) + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n)
     = 4(2t(n/8) + n/4/log(n/4)) + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n)
     = 8t(n/8) + n/log(n/4) + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n)
     = 16t(n/16) + n/log(n/8) + n/log(n/4) + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n)
     = n * t(1) + n/log(2) + n/log(4) + ... + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n)
     = n(1 + Sum[i = 1 to log(n)](1/log(2^i)))
     = n(1 + Sum[i = 1 to log(n)](1/i))
     ~= n(1 + log(log(n)))
     = n + n*log(log(n)))
     ~= n*log(log(n)) [n -> infinity]
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in line 5 why you wrote nt(n/n) ? i think we should write 2^i*(n/2^i) – user123 Aug 25 '12 at 7:03
    
yes thanks but i have problem in last line. i cant calculate sum of Sum[i = 0 to log(n/2)](1 / log(n/(2^i)) – user123 Aug 25 '12 at 7:07
    
so the the answer is : n * sum[i=0 to log n-1](1/log n - i) – user123 Aug 25 '12 at 7:18
    
you yourself write it in last line and also i think it is right . what's wrong? – user123 Aug 25 '12 at 7:24
    
thanks. i have a question. in line 6 we have : n/log(n/8) + n/log(n/4) + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n) .but in next line we have : n/log(2) + n/log(4) + ... + n/log(n/2) + n/log(n) how it it possible? – user123 Aug 25 '12 at 7:45

When you start unrolling the recursion, you will get:

enter image description here

Your base case is T(1) = 1, so this means that n = 2^k. Substituting you will get:

enter image description here

The second sum behaves the same as harmonic series and therefore can be approximated as log(k). Now that k = log(n) the resulting answer is:

enter image description here

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