Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this program I have swapped the first 2 names

#include<stdio.h>
void swap(char **,char **);
main()
{
 char *name[4]={"amol", "robin", "shanu" };
 swap(&name[0],&name[2]);
 printf("%s %s",name[0],name[2]);
}
void swap(char **x,char **y)
 {
 char *temp;
 temp=*x;
 *x=*y;
 *y=temp;
 }

This programs runs perfectly but when I use the function swap(char *,char *) it does not swap the address why? why I have to use pointer to pointer?

share|improve this question
    
The fact that a string is a char* in C is probably adding to the confusion. Try implementing this with an array of integers first, then an array of pointers to integers, then an array of strings. –  Arnout Engelen Aug 25 '12 at 8:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I assume you understand that to swap integers you would have function like swap(int *, int *)

Similarly, When you want to swap strings which is char *. You would need function like swap(char **, char **).

In such cases, you take their pointers and swap their content (otherwise values will not be swapped once function returns). For integer content, pointer is int * and in case of strings content is char * pointer to it is char **.

share|improve this answer

Pointers (like all values) are passed by value.

If you use swap(char * a,char * b) and write a = tmp; this changes only the local variable a and not the original variable in the caller.

This simpler example also doesn't work as intended for the same reason:

void change(int x) {
    x = 0; // Only changes the local variable.
}

int main(void) { 
    int x = 0;
    change(x);       // This does not have any effect.
    printf("%d", x); // 0 is printed
    return 0; 
} 

http://ideone.com/u7Prp

share|improve this answer

char *name[4] is holding address of 3 string literals. If we want to swap, we have to pass the reference of the array where exactly the string literal's address is stored. That means we have to pass name+0 and name+2 or &name[0] and &name[2] to the swap function.

And also if you want to swap. you have to receive the address as char ** and then we have to change the address of the string literals in the array.

If you receive it as char * and if you tries to change like temp = x; x = y; y = temp, that will be local change to the function swap. It will not reflect on the array name.

share|improve this answer

Sounds like this is what you are looking for:

#include<stdio.h>
void swap(char *,char *);
main()
{
 char name[4][10]={"amol", "robin", "shanu" };
 swap(name[0],name[2]);
 printf("%s %s",name[0],name[2]);
}
void swap(char *x,char *y)
 {
 char *temp;
 temp=x;
 x=y;
 y=temp;
 }

The main difference is the declaration of name. In your version you declare an array of pointers so you have to dereference the entries as *name[0]. In the second version it declares an array of 'char arrays' or strings and each entry holds a string, not a pointer, so you can dereference the entries as name[0]. You will see the difference clearly if you use gdb and step through the code while using the print command.

share|improve this answer
    
This lets you use function swap(char *,char *) which is specified in your question. –  Alec Danyshchuk Aug 25 '12 at 9:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.