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For example, propose map<int,void*>hold where void* is always storing pointers from classA is it safe to cast it back later via static_cast?

classA* ptr = static_cast<classA*>( holditerator->second );

the reason void* is used is because hold is member of a class defined on a header used by some cpp files which don't know what classA is. I would have to include the header of classA definitions on these cpp files which can't be done by many reasons.

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1  
Why would you do this? Please provide more context as there is likely a more suitable solution. –  Johnsyweb Aug 25 '12 at 9:50
    
Why don't you use a map<int, classA*> in the first place ? –  BatchyX Aug 25 '12 at 9:52
    
@BatchyX I'm guessing hold doesn't only contain classA*? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 25 '12 at 9:53
4  
Can't you forward declare classA and use classA pointers? –  rve Aug 25 '12 at 9:58
    
Using reinterpret_cast would be better as it fits the purpose –  Quizzical Aug 25 '12 at 10:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, static_cast is OK in that case and the right thing to use.

I have to ask why you don't store classA* pointers in the first place though. If you want to put derived class pointers into it, then beware, you need to upcast/upconvert (implicitly or explicitly) the derived class pointers to classA* before you put them into the map.

But even if you put also derived class pointers into the map, a base class pointer would suffice because a derived class pointer is implicitly convertible to a base class pointer.

The reason void* is used is because hold is member of a class define on a header used by some cpp files which don't know what classA is.

That can be a valid reason to prevent layering violations.

I would have to include the header of classA definitions on these cpp files which can't be done by many reasons.

That's most probably not necessary in your case. A forward declaration suffices. If the header knows what is put into the map, but just wants to avoid including additional headers, this is the way to go.

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I've edited the question –  Viniyo Shouta Aug 25 '12 at 9:57

As Johannes explained, the static_cast is ok. Another technique to prevent the dependencies to ClassA in the cpp files is to use the pimpl idiom.

// in header file
class classB {
public:
    classB();
    ~classB();
private:
    class impl;
    unique_ptr<impl> pimpl;
};



// in implementation file
#include "classA.hpp"

class classB::impl 
{
    std::map<int, classA> hold;  // hidden in implementation file
};

classB::classB() : pimpl{ new impl{ /*...*/ } } { }
classB::~classB() { } 
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1  
excellent idea :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 25 '12 at 10:19

Writing void* in the header just because the users of the map should not know about the actual type is not a good idea, as you lose type safety everywhere in your code, including at places which do know about ClassA.

Consider

  1. deriving ClassA from an class which every part of your code may know about,
  2. wrapping the map into an object which provides an interface to those parts of the code that have to deal with the map, but not with ClassA,
  3. declaring, but not defining class ClassA in your header file (may be dangerous if objects are destroyed at some place where ClassA is declared, but not defined),
  4. using templates,
  5. implementing the class containing the map as a derived subclass, such that the map field can be put into the derived subclass.

Point 5: Illustration (= template pattern)

Instead of

class Containing {
    private:
       map<int,void*> myMap;
    public:
       void somePublicFunction () { // ...implementation }
};

you write

// Containing.h
class Containing {
   protected:
       virtual void doSomething () = 0;
   public:
       static Containing* Create ();
       void somePublicFunction () { doSomething (); }
       virtual ~Containing () { }
};

// Containing.cc
#include ContainingImplementation.h
Containing* Containing::Create () { return new ContainingImplementation; }

// ContainingImplementation.h / cc
class ContainingImplementation : public Containing {
   protected:
      virtual void doSomething () { // ... }
   private:
      map<int,ClassA*> myMap;
   public:
      virtual ~ContainingImplementation () { }
};
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