Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have been using jQuery for a year, but I still don't understand how this code works:

alert($('#elementID').val()); // It gets the value of element

$('#elementID').val('setting Value'); // the same function is setting value

some other functions of jquery also do the same like .html()

I want to know how this thing is achieved? How do they overload a javascript function?

share|improve this question
3  
It just checks to see if a value is given in the function, if not it retrieves the current value ? – adeneo Aug 25 '12 at 9:56
    
@adeneo yes it is does so but how thing happens , I dont know any technique to do so with the same function – Rupesh Patel Aug 25 '12 at 9:59
    
Hmm, in C++, we can use default parameters to mimic overloading, and here, optional parameters for javascript. – Baiyan Huang Aug 25 '12 at 11:44
up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are no overloads in javascript, so feats like this are performed using optional parameters. JavaScript allows you to call functions without specifying parameters. For example:

function val(text)
{
  if (arguments != null && arguments.length > 0) {
    alert("i'm setting value here to " + text);
  } else {
    alert("i'm getting value here");
  }
}

val(); // alerts value getter
val('hi!'); // alerts value setter and the message

This example was written to point out arguments collection which you get in every function. Every function can fetch it's parameters as a collection and can accordingly perform it's logic. However, displayed example would be written differently in real world:

function val(text)
{
  if (typeof text === "string") {
    alert("i'm setting value here to " + text);
  } else {
    alert("i'm getting value here");
  }
}

Each parameter which you do not pass to a function gets "value" of undefined (not null). This lets you use the shortest logical expression. You can use any value in if statement. Variables which are null or undefined will simply be evaluated as false.

As a comment below pointed out if text parameter is empty string if (text) would return false. For that reason, for text parameters check parameters by type.

It would be beneficial for you to also read about null and undefined differences.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning arguments. – The Alpha Aug 25 '12 at 10:03
    
in your first code snippet var "arguments" is it a default keyWord? or where you defined it ? – Rupesh Patel Aug 25 '12 at 10:07
    
+1 this is better than my answer. – Adi Aug 25 '12 at 10:08
    
Arguments is default keyword. I also provided link to Mozilla Developer Network where you can read about it. – Nikola Radosavljević Aug 25 '12 at 10:08
1  
Empty string and 0 are also evaluated as false, so in your second example you can't set value by calling val(0) – user502144 Aug 25 '12 at 10:12

It's simply done by checking if the function was called with a parameter or not

function stuff(moreStuff){
   if(typeof moreStuff === "undefined"){
      return originalStuff;
   }else{
      setStuff(moreStuff);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
so there is no overloading concept in JS but we can do some work around, Thanks for reply :) – Rupesh Patel Aug 25 '12 at 10:02
    
It is safe to write if(moreStuff === undefined) in this example because moreStuff is an argument. stackoverflow.com/questions/4725603 – user502144 Aug 25 '12 at 10:25

Very simple, just check if the variable has a value:

function foo(param) {
    // Method 1
    if (param != null) {
        // Parameter is defined
    } else {
        // No parameter (or null given)
    }

    // Method 2
    if (arguments.length > 0) {
        // At least one argument has been defined
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the second option. But your param != null may not work as intended - see saladwithsteve.com/2008/02/javascript-undefined-vs-null.html – techfoobar Aug 25 '12 at 10:02
    
this doesn't work null will not match with param if called lie this foo() – Rupesh Patel Aug 25 '12 at 10:05
    
@techfoobar I'm aware of that, but the check as implemented in my code above simply allows only parameters that are not undefined and not null. – Niko Aug 25 '12 at 10:10
    
@RupeshPatel Yes, it will. If you do foo(), param will be undefined - and undefined == null is true. – Niko Aug 25 '12 at 10:11
    
@Niko As per I know undefined is the type and null is an object itself – Rupesh Patel Aug 25 '12 at 10:15
function foo(value)
{
     if(typeof value != 'undefined')
     {
         // calling foo(2332)
     }
     else
     {
         // foo()
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your param name is value and you're checking against yourvar! – techfoobar Aug 25 '12 at 10:00

As nearly everyone else mentioned, they did not overload the parameter, but in the first statement, there is not arguments provided for the function. In the second one though, an argument has been provided. Therefore a simple check typeof something == "undefined" could easily modify and set apart the different results.

This is the relevant jQuery code making up the .val() function (version 1.8.0):

val: function( value ) {
        var hooks, ret, isFunction,
            elem = this[0];

        if ( !arguments.length ) {
            if ( elem ) {
                hooks = jQuery.valHooks[ elem.type ] || jQuery.valHooks[ elem.nodeName.toLowerCase() ];

                if ( hooks && "get" in hooks && (ret = hooks.get( elem, "value" )) !== undefined ) {
                    return ret;
                }

                ret = elem.value;

                return typeof ret === "string" ?
                    // handle most common string cases
                    ret.replace(rreturn, "") :
                    // handle cases where value is null/undef or number
                    ret == null ? "" : ret;
            }

            return;
        }

        isFunction = jQuery.isFunction( value );

        return this.each(function( i ) {
            var val,
                self = jQuery(this);

            if ( this.nodeType !== 1 ) {
                return;
            }

            if ( isFunction ) {
                val = value.call( this, i, self.val() );
            } else {
                val = value;
            }

            // Treat null/undefined as ""; convert numbers to string
            if ( val == null ) {
                val = "";
            } else if ( typeof val === "number" ) {
                val += "";
            } else if ( jQuery.isArray( val ) ) {
                val = jQuery.map(val, function ( value ) {
                    return value == null ? "" : value + "";
                });
            }

            hooks = jQuery.valHooks[ this.type ] || jQuery.valHooks[ this.nodeName.toLowerCase() ];

            // If set returns undefined, fall back to normal setting
            if ( !hooks || !("set" in hooks) || hooks.set( this, val, "value" ) === undefined ) {
                this.value = val;
            }
        });
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning jQuery and relevant code – Rupesh Patel Aug 25 '12 at 10:20
    
thank you a lot. – think123 Aug 25 '12 at 11:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.