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How can i take the output of this command...

ps -ef | grep ^apache | grep /sbin/httpd | awk '{print $2}'
16779
16783
16784
16785
16786
16787
16788
16789
16790
16794
16795
16796
16797
16799
16800
16801
16802
16803
16804
16805 

...so a single column of numbers... and transform those numbers into a single line of numbers separated by a " -p "... This would be used for the following...

lsof -p 16779 -p 16783 -p 16784 ... 
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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pipe into

sed 's/^/-p /' | tr '\n' ' '
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1  
The { print } bit can be replaced by a 1 as that is the default block when matching a rule. –  Thor Aug 25 '12 at 15:24
    
The sed bit could be 's/^/-p /' –  Thor Aug 25 '12 at 19:15

If you have it available, pidof would be more convenient:

lsof $(pidof apache | sed 's/^\| / -p /g')
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You could simplify the pipeline considerably; see the many other answers. Generally combining sed and awk in the same pipeline can nearly always be avoided. ps -ef | awk '/^apache/ && /\/sbin\/httpd/{ printf(" -p %i", $2 } –  tripleee Aug 25 '12 at 15:10
    
I was copying the OPs command line, but I agree the other answers have that covered, I'll remove the bottom example. –  Thor Aug 25 '12 at 15:23

You could pipe into awk:

awk 'BEGIN { printf "lsof" } { printf " -p %s", $1 } END { printf "\n" }'

Result:

lsof -p 16779 -p 16783 -p 16784 -p 16785 -p 16786 -p 16787 -p 16788 -p 16789 -p 16790 -p 16794 -p 16795 -p 16796 -p 16797 -p 16799 -p 16800 -p 16801 -p 16802 -p 16803 -p 16804 -p 16805
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tmp="lsof "
for i in `ps -ef | awk '/^apache/ && /httpd/ {print $2}'`;
do
 tmp=${tmp}" -p "${i}" "; 
done
echo $tmp

Should do the trick

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In a command substitution, the newlines from the pipeline will be converted to spaces.

pids=$( ps -ef | awk '/^apache/ && /\/sbin\/httpd/ {print $2}' ) )

Then a call to printf can be used to format the options for lsof. The format string is repeated as necessary for each argument contained in pids.

lsof $( printf "-p %s " $pids )
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Add the following code to your one liner:

awk '{print $0 " -p "}' | tr '\n' '  ' | awk -F " " '{print "lsof -p "  $0}'

Final code :

ps -ef | grep ^apache | grep /sbin/httpd | awk '{print $2}' | awk '{print $0 " -p "}' | tr '\n' '  ' | awk -F " " '{print "lsof -p "  $0}'
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