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The scenario

Two systems(not server) running PHP and PostgreSQL with the following versions

  • Fedora 15:

    PHP

    PHP 5.3.13 (cli) (built: May 9 2012 14:38:35)
    Copyright (c) 1997-2012 The PHP Group
    Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2012 Zend Technologies
    pdo_pgsql
    PostgreSQL(libpq) Version 9.0.7
    Module version 1.0.2


    PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL 9.1.4
    With CITEXT extension enabled.

  • ArchLinux:

    PHP

    PHP 5.4.6 (cli) (built: Aug 16 2012 12:50:09)
    Copyright (c) 1997-2012 The PHP Group
    Zend Engine v2.4.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2012 Zend Technologies
    pdo_pgsql
    PostgreSQL(libpq) Version 9.1.4
    Module version 1.0.2


    PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL 9.1.4
    With CITEXT extension enabled.


when a simple query such as

select column1 from schema1.table1 where column1= ? 

Where column1 is of the type CITEXT, is executed through PHP PDO

  • On Fedora with PHP 5.3.13,libpq 9.0.7, the query performs as expected with CITEXT(a case insensitive search occurs).
  • On ArchLinux with PHP 5.4.6,libpq 9.1.4, the query does not perform as expected with CITEXT(a case sensitive search occurs).

I am guessing the newer version of PHP PDO libs are doing something similar to this:

select column1 from schema1.table1 where column1= 'value'::text;

during binding.

  • Am I right?
  • Is there a workaround? Otherwise, the use of CITEXT as a column data type to gain the advantage of case insensitive search is useless when using newer versions of PDO.

Update

After turning statement level logging on, on ArchLinux with PHP 5.4.6,libpq 9.1.4 :

LOG:  execute pdo_stmt_00000001: select column1 from schema1.table1 where column1 = $1
DETAIL:  parameters: $1 = 'value'
LOG:  statement: DEALLOCATE pdo_stmt_00000001

where the actual value of the column column1 is VALUE.

Still comes back with 0 elements.

When the statement

select column1 from schema1.table1 where column1 = 'value';

is executed directly on the PSQL prompt comes back with a single row.

 column1  
---------
  VALUE
 (1 row)

So, the type casting does not take place! I still am not able to understand the behaviour of PDO/postgresql.


Update 2012-08-27 16:15:43.669142+00 (UMT + 0)

After trying to directly execute a query without preparing a statement.

Here is the code that was used to test :

try {
    $db = new PDO('pgsql:dbname=database1;user=user;password=pass;host=localhost');
    $db->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
    $sql = "SELECT column1 from schema1.column1 where column1 = 'value'::citext ";
    $retval=$db->query($sql);
    foreach ($retval as $row) {
        print $row['uname'] . '<br>';
    }
}catch (PDOException $PDOerr) {
    echo 'An error occured : <br>';
    var_dump($PDOerr);
    exit;
    //some thing went wrong while performing the action on db.
    }

I get the error :

object(PDOException)#10 (8) { ["message":protected]=> string(211) "SQLSTATE[42704]: \
Undefined object: 7 ERROR: type "citext" does not exist LINE 1: ...

I do not understand why citext is not getting detected! When the statement is executed directly on the PSQL prompt, everything works fine as mentioned above.


Final Update

It was a search path problem for the user I was trying to login as. I am guessing I had created the user when I had done a session-wise set search_path to some other schema and instead of the default '"$user",public' it was set to the other schema. The user did not have any access to public schema at all. Thanks to Daniel Vérité for pointing me in the right direction.

BTW, used ALTER ROLE user SET search_path TO "$user",public; to set the search path. Although, $user is useless as I do not have any schema named after the current users.

share|improve this question
    
(previous comment removed). An idea: since you're using non-public schemas, make sure that the type "citext" is visible from the schema you're working on. Be explicit about the search path with which this query is executed. Worst case, try to prefix the type name with its schema (public?) –  Daniel Vérité Aug 27 '12 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

  1. Why guess? Turn on statement logging and know.
  2. File a bug report with the PDO project if you think it is a bug, or at least check list archives and see if there is a good reason for it.
  3. Try something like the following as a workaround.

    c = (?)::citext

I'm guessing you'll be out of luck because it looks like the type constants are shared for all dbs

http://www.php.net/manual/en/pdo.constants.php

Congratulations to the PDO team for a design choice that ranks with making your filesystem library only support upper-case 8.3 to maintain compatibility was ms-dos 6.22


The explicit DEALLOCATE suggests there was a PREPARE issued earlier. That will take a list of typed parameters so presumably the text type is being set there.

share|improve this answer
    
pardon for the delayed reply.. I am about 15 day old in the postgresql world, Thanks for indicating statement level logging. Please check the update in question after turning on logging. Trying to incorporate the workaround now. –  ThinkingMonkey Aug 25 '12 at 16:03
    
It was a search path problem for the user I was trying to login as. I am guessing I had created the user when I had done a session-wise set search_path to some other schema and instead of the default '"$user",public' it was set to the other schema. The user did not have any access to public schema at all. Thanks to Daniel Vérité for pointing me in the right direction. –  ThinkingMonkey Aug 27 '12 at 20:33
1  
BTW, used ALTER ROLE user SET search_path TO "$user",public; to set the search path. Although, $user is useless as I do not have any schema named after the current users. –  ThinkingMonkey Aug 27 '12 at 20:38

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