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**NSLog(@"%0.2f", 1.345); // output 1.34**
NSLog(@"%0.2f", 1.3451);// output 1.35
NSLog(@"%0.2f", round(1.345 * 100)/100.);//output 1.35

Why the first line output 1.34?!!

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Updated:

NSLog(@"%.2f", round([@"644.435" doubleValue] * 100) / 100); // output 644.43, 

but

NSLog(@"%.2f", round([@"6.435" doubleValue] * 100) / 100); // output 6.44? 

If I want to convert a NSString to keep two digit after the point, would you please advise how to convert?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because 1.345 cannot be represented exactly in IEEE754. More than likely, it's something like 1.34444444449 which, when printed, gives you 1.34.

If you search for things like ieee754, precision and floating point, one of the billion or so articles should be able to enlighten you :-)

Look particularly for: What every computer scientist should know about floating point.

Going into a little more detail, examine the following C program:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    float f = 1.345f;
    double d = 1.345;
    printf ("f = %.20f\nd = %.20lf\n", f, d);
    return 0;
}

The output of this is:

f = 1.34500002861022949219
d = 1.34499999999999997335

So the float value is a little above 1.345 and the double (which is what you get when you specify 1.345 without the f suffix) is a little below.

That explains why you're seeing it truncated to 1.34 rather than rounded to 1.35.

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A calculator shows the number as 1.3450000286102294921875 –  dasblinkenlight Aug 25 '12 at 12:51
2  
@dasblinkenlight, that's for a float which would be 1.345f. The double 1.345 is a little below - see the update. –  paxdiablo Aug 25 '12 at 13:01
    
+1 You're right, nice find! –  dasblinkenlight Aug 25 '12 at 13:08
    
Thanks @paxdiable, thanks! I tried NSLog(@"%0.2f", 1.345f); // output 1.35 –  ZuYuan Aug 25 '12 at 13:22
    
Hi Paxdiablo, I have another problem: NSLog(@"%.2f", round([@"644.435" doubleValue] * 100) / 100); // output 644.43, but NSLog(@"%.2f", round([@"6.435" doubleValue] * 100) / 100); // output 6.44? If I want to convert a NSString to keep two digit after the point, would you please advise how to convert? –  ZuYuan Aug 30 '12 at 15:57

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