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I would like to evaluate(not convert) infix expression in C++. If you posses algorithm or even implementation of such algorithm(may be not C++, any language... I will try to rewrite it to C++) share please.

Evaluation means give the value of expression. (2+2)*3 is 12

I am sorry, I forgot that I am talking about stack solution, cause I know the tree solution and It is not suitable this time : (.

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closed as not a real question by Kerrek SB, John Palmer, j0k, gion_13, Anteru Aug 26 '12 at 12:18

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
It's not clear what you want to do. Could you explain more what you mean by "evaluate infox expression"? –  sth Aug 25 '12 at 13:00

2 Answers 2

How do you got the expression? If you got it like (3 + 4) - (1 * 2) + 1 =

                  +  
            /          \
           -            1
     /          \   
    +            *          
 /     \      /    \
3      4    1       2

http://cboard.cprogramming.com/cplusplus-programming/32682-inserting-infix-into-binary-tree.html

do a tree transversal of the tree like Left Root Right so it will be sth like this: 3 + 4 the result - the result of 1 * 2 the result + 1.

If you got the expression like 34+12*-1+ you can simulate assembly like do a stack and if you get to an operator pop the last 2 elements in the stack and apply the operator: put 3 in stack, put 4 in stack, get op. + so pop the last 2 elements and use the operator. Now you got only 7 in stack. Now read until get an operator so in the stack you will have 7 1 2 after op. * in stack you got 7 2 after op. - you get only 5 in stack add 1 in stack: Stack 5 1, use the last operator + and get the final result 6.

Ok, here is the code:

#include <STACK>

int GetResult( char * rpn ) 
{
    std::stack<int> myStack;

    int nr1, nr2; int length = strlen(rpn);

    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        if (isdigit(rpn[i]))
        {
            myStack.push(rpn[i] - '0');
        }
        else
        {
            switch(rpn[i])
            {
                case '+':
                    nr1 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    nr2 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    myStack.push(nr2 + nr1);
                    break;

                case '-':
                    nr1 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    nr2 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    myStack.push(nr2 - nr1);
                    break;

                case '*':
                    nr1 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    nr2 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    myStack.push(nr2 * nr1);
                    break;

                case '/':
                    nr1 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    nr2 = myStack.top();
                    myStack.pop();
                    myStack.push(nr2 / nr1);
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    return myStack.top();
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char *rpn = "34+12*-1+";

    int rez = GetResult(rpn);

    printf("%i", rez);

    return 0;
}
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I am sorry I forgat that I am talking with stack solution. I know the tree solution. –  Yoda Aug 25 '12 at 13:11
    
@RobertKilar I don't understand. Rephrase please! –  Thanatos Aug 25 '12 at 13:13
    
I ment that I know the Tree traversal solution(I have already done it), but I need the stack one(kind of which we use for RPN- reverse polish noation). –  Yoda Aug 25 '12 at 13:15
    
So do you want me to post the stack solution? Because I already explained it? –  Thanatos Aug 25 '12 at 13:17
    
If it possible please post it : ). Sorry, I am reading all the advices and links i got from all of you. It would help a lot. Now i found java solution but it is with some issues, so I am trying to understand it and correct it. –  Yoda Aug 25 '12 at 13:24

By far the easiest way is to convert the infix expression to postfix notation using Dijkstra's Shunting-yard algorithm, and evaulate the result, which is, like, trivial. There are code samples of this all over the internet (take a look at Rosetta code or LiteratePrograms).


Alternatively, if you'd like to learn, and you'd like to enter the magical world of parsing and a bit of compiler theory, write a recursive descent parser. It's great fun.


Oh and, if you'd like something more robust, you could take a look at Pratt parsing, which is awesome. Here's a great article about it.

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