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If You want to Implement a 2D Array ; which of the following technique you will prefer

1.Row Major/Col Major 2.Array of Pointers

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closed as not a real question by Burkhard, Heisenbug, Christian Rau, Eddy, kapa Aug 25 '12 at 19:54

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Neither; I'd use a 1-D array and access it in strides. – Kerrek SB Aug 25 '12 at 13:00

In the book Numerical Recipes in C (online version) you can find a chapter on pages 20-23 discussing how they implement a 2-dimensional array.

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If the usage of 2D array is in more than one function or the size if too big, then we can go for dynamic allocation of 2D array using pointer variable like below.

int *a;

a = (int *)malloc(ROWSIZE * COLSIZE * sizeof(int));

//This 2D dynamic array should be accessed like below

for (i = 0; i < ROWSIZE; i++)
{
    for (j = 0; j < COLSIZE; j++)
    {
        a[(i * ROWSIZE) + j] = i + j;
    }
}

or we can do with double pointer variable also like below

int **a;
a = (int **)malloc(ROWSIZE * sizeof(int*));
for(i = 0; i < ROWSIZE; i++)
{
    a[i] = (int *)malloc(COLSIZE * sizeof(int));
}

//This 2D dynamic array should be accessed like below

for (i = 0; i < ROWSIZE; i++)
{
    for (j = 0; j < COLSIZE; j++)
    {
        a[i][j] = i + j; //readability is more in this method
    }
}

If the usage of 2D array is inside only a function and the size is not too big, we can go for local 2D array. Becuase dynamic memory allocation is a costly process.

int a[ROWSIZE][COLSIZE];

Note : Take care of null check for malloc

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Well, a dynamic array of dynamic arrays is surely one of the worst ideas to implement a dynamic 2D array. – Christian Rau Aug 25 '12 at 13:45
    
@ChristianRau : But that will be the only solution if we want to create an dynamic array, which should have scope on n functions – raja ashok Aug 25 '12 at 13:49
    
What does this "should have scope on n functions" line mean? What about a simple malloc(ROWSIZE * COLSIZE * sizeof(int*)). Of course this requires you to make the index magic yourself, but that is by ages better than an array of arrays scattered around in memory. – Christian Rau Aug 25 '12 at 14:03
    
updated the answer with both the method. – raja ashok Aug 25 '12 at 14:21

Certainly the array of pointers approach offers the nice syntactic advantage of being able to address the elements of the array in good old C syntax, ie a[3][4]. And, it allows each row to have a different length if that fits your project. However, I think the memory management is not worth the effort and there may be a performance hit because each access requires two dereferencing steps. Assuming that you are allocating rows, you can treat them as C arrays, which they are, and optimise performance but the columns must always be indexed in the convenient but slow way.

As for row or column major order in the single allocation method, this depends entirely on what you want to do. If you are more likely to need contiguous rows, use row major. If you are doing linear algebra it is more common to want to work with columns so column major is more convenient.

I have done a fair amount of work with numerical software and have found that the single allocation method works best for me. I generally use column major because interfacing with Fortran is easier.

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