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I understand that

List<? extends T>

allows for the list to be any sub-type of T (or T itself), and that

List<T>

only allows for lists of the type T. However, take a look at the following method signature:

public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<? extends T> myList, int begin, int end){

And the following classes:

public class ClassA{

}
public class ClassB extends ClassA implements Comparable<ClassA>{
public int compareTo(ClassA s){
    //do comparison
}
}
public class ClassC extends ClassB{

}

Let's assume T is ClassB, and I want to pass a sub-type of T (ClassC) for my list:

public static void main(String[] args){
    List<ClassC> myC = new ArrayList<ClassC>();
    ClassC a = findMax(myC, 2, 3);
}

In this case, how does java infer that T is ClassB, and not ClassC? And if it isn't able to infer ClassB (and actually infers ClassC instead) then wouldn't the following method signature (without the "List") be equivalent?

public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<T> myList, int begin, int end){

Thanks, Jack

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3 Answers

Firstly, ? extends Object adds no value, because everything extends Object, so these two methods are equivalent:

public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<T> myList, int begin, int end)
public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<T> myList, int begin, int end)

Having made that simplification, your question is basically are these equivalent:

public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<T> myList, int begin, int end)
public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<? extends T> myList, int begin, int end)

They are (not* the same.

The reason is, with the second method, you can pass in a List with a type that's a subclass of the returned type, whereas in the first method the List's type must be the same type as the returned type.

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But the inferred type can be a supertype in either case. List<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>(); Number findMax = findMax(l,0,0); This compiles with either version. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 25 '12 at 13:31
1  
@bohemian:? extends Object adds no value...are equivalent.You are wrong here.They are not equivalent as the latter will be erased to Comparable and is not binary compatible with pre-generics code (while the first is binary compatible) –  Cratylus Aug 25 '12 at 13:31
    
@bohemian But how does java determine whether ClassC is T or a subtype of T? –  Oh Yeah Aug 25 '12 at 14:06
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The way type inference works, T is always going to be inferred to the type param of the list you call the function with, so the additional liberty given by <? extends T> will never be used. You can write List<T> with the same result.

Answering to the subtler point raised by bohemian, the inferred type will be assignable to any supertype as well, so once again no flexibility is added by the longer signature.

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But if <? extends T> isn't used, why doesn't everyone just write <T>? –  Oh Yeah Aug 25 '12 at 13:49
2  
I wonder the same. There's probably yet another, even subtler point that we are overlooking. That's Generics for you, 10% benefit and 90% head-scratching. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 25 '12 at 14:08
    
Haha. Good to know. –  Oh Yeah Aug 25 '12 at 14:36
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how does java infer that T is ClassB, and not ClassC?

I don't follow you here. Generics is a compile type technique.
The erasure of public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<? extends T> myList, int begin, int end) is to Object i.e.
this compiles to public static Object findMax(List myList, int begin, int end)

When you instantiate the list List<ClassC> myC = new ArrayList<ClassC>(); and pass it to the method, the compiler ensures type safety, essentially that the pass list complies with the declaration. In this case Class C implements a Comparable and you could return back Class B since the compiler would accept it.
Generics do not exist at runtime.

Update after comment:
This public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<? extends T> myList, int begin, int end)

is not the same as:

public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<T> myList, int begin, int end)

This is not about type inference. The compiler would make the same type inference here either it was T or ? extends T in this specific case.
The difference lies in the contract. The public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>> T findMax(List<? extends T> myList, int begin, int end) declares a method that guarantees not to modify your collection (at least not a way that would corrupt it).
The List<? extends T> myList essentially makes list a read-only list inside the body of findMax which can not add any instance in the list (either T or subtype of T) except null.
If you declared List<T> myList then it is not a read-only list and one could add elements in your list e.g. inside findMax you could do: myList.add(myList.get(0)); This is not possible with the declaration of findMax as List<? extends T> myList

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I just meant if I pass List<ClassC> as an argument (for findMax()) how does java know if ClassC represents T or a subtype of T? –  Oh Yeah Aug 25 '12 at 14:26
    
@Jack:It does not.At runtime T is lost.At compile time, compiler had made sure that all your actual parameters and return type adhere to your declarion and ensures type safety. –  Cratylus Aug 25 '12 at 15:35
    
Yes, at runtime T is lost. But I am wondering about compile time. At compile time is the compiler able to tell if the class I pass as my list type is T or a subtype of T? If so, how? If not, what is the purpose of writing "findMax(List<? extends T>..." ? Writing "findMax(List<T>" should be the same thing, correct? –  Oh Yeah Aug 25 '12 at 22:15
    
@Jack:Updated answer –  Cratylus Aug 26 '12 at 11:21
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