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What if I have a table structured as follows?

X - Y

3 / 10

5 / 7

2 / 15

So those are some kind of coordinates. How would I write them to a SQL-server table via LINQ to SQL?

In other words how do I save coordinate points of a graph to a single table?

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2  
LINQ Table? What is that and what are these. –  Nikhil Agrawal Aug 25 '12 at 14:58
    
Edited I want to store those points in a sql table using LINQ –  Prot Aug 25 '12 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes. Normal database tables are "2-d" as this is, there's a set of columns with names and types along one dimension, and zero or more rows along another.

Note that this has nothing to do with "X" and "Y" representing points in a space in a 2-d space. If you had "X", "Y" and "Z", representing points in a 3-d space, then the data would still be 2-d.

As such, it's the same as any other database table, so just use Linq2Sql, EntityFramework, Linq2NHibernate, or whatever other database query source for linq you want, and write to the table in the means it has. E.g. with Linq2SQL you can change fields on an entity obtained from the table or add new records with InsertOnSubmit() or InsertAllOnSubmit(), and then call SubmitChanges() on the datacontext.

Let's take a Linq2SQL example, though much the same is true of the other approaches.

Let's have a table in SQL first (alternatively, you can go the other way around, personally I prefer to do each separately by hand, but there are tools for both creating the C# from the SQL and the SQL from the C#).

CREATE TABLE Coordinates
(
  id int identity primary key not null,
  x int not null,
  y int not null
)

We don't strictly need the id column, but it'll make life easier for us in a lot of ways, especially if we want to have more than one instance of the same x and y - there has to be some sort of id to make updating possible.

Now, the next bit will seem more complicated than it really is. In reality, if this was produced from DBML produced from examining the DB, then it'll be using partial to put most of the implementation in files you don't need to look at. Otherwise if you were doing it by hand, you can use inheritance from a common class to use re-use on much of the repetiton to this.

[Table(Name="dbo.Coordinates")]
public class Coordinate : INotifyPropertyChanging, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangingEventHandler PropertyChanging;
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private int _id;
    private int _x;
    private int _y;
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
    }
    protected void OnPropertyChanging(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangingEventHandler handler = PropertyChanging;
        if (handler != null)
            handler(this, new PropertyChangingEventArgs(name));
    }

    [Column(Storage = "_id", AutoSync = AutoSync.OnInsert, DbType = "Int NOT NULL IDENTITY", IsPrimaryKey = true, IsDbGenerated = true)]
    public int Id
    {
        get
        {
            return _id;
        }
        set
        {
            if(_id != value)
            {
                SendPropertyChanging("Id");
                _id = value;
                SendPropertyChanged("Id");
            }
        }
    }
    [Column(Storage = "_x", DbType = "Int NOT NULL")]
    public int X
    {
        get
        {
            return _x;
        }
        set
        {
            if(_x != value)
            {
                SendPropertyChanging("X");
                _x = value;
                SendPropertyChanged("X");
            }
        }
    }
    [Column(Storage = "_y", DbType = "Int NOT NULL")]
    public int Y
    {
        get
        {
            return _y;
        }
        set
        {
            if(_y != value)
            {
                SendPropertyChanging("Y");
                _y = value;
                SendPropertyChanged("Y");
            }
        }
    }
}

As said, this is making things look a bit worse that what you'll actually be dealing with. You can mostly think of the class as being like:

public class Coordinate
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int X { get; set; }
    public int Y { get; set; }
}

Still, despite this being all you have to worry about, some people who favour the other approaches make the amount of boilerplate one of their arguments.

Anyway, you also have a datacontext class that lets deal with all of this. If you call db.GetTable<Coordinate>() it returns an object that represents the table in the database. Because you will do this a lot, it's common to create a property on a class derived from DataContext that lets does this for you:

public Table<Coordinate> Coordinates
{
  get { return GetTable<Coordinate>(); }
}

(Again, use DBML and have this done for you).

Now, lets start by adding your example list of three coordinates:

using(var db = new OurDataContext(connString))
{
  var tab = db.Coordinates;
  tab.InsertOnSubmit(new Coordinates{X=3,Y=10});
  tab.InsertOnSubmit(new Coordinates{X=5,Y=7});
  tab.InsertOnSubmit(new Coordinates{X=2,Y=15});
  db.SubmitChanges();
}

(becomes a bunch of SQL inserts)

So far, so boring. Let's add 500 new entries instead:

private static IEnumerable<Coordinate> ProduceRandomCoordinates(int num)
{
  var rnd = new Random();
  while(num-- > 0)
    yield return new Coordinate{X=rnd.Next(-100, 101), Y=rnd.Next(-100, 101)};
}

using(var db = new OurDataContext(connString))
{
  var tab = db.Coordinates;
  tab.InsertAllOnSubmit(ProduceRandomCoordinates(500));
  db.SubmitChanges();
}

(becomes a bunch of SQL inserts)

Lets find out how many we have:

using(var db = new OurDataContext(connString))
  Console.WriteLine(db.Coordinates.Count());

(Becomes the SQL SELECT COUNT(*) from Coordinates);

Let's find out how many we have where X is greater than Y:

using(var db = new OurDataContext(connString))
  Console.WriteLine(db.Coordinates.Count(co => co.X > co.Y)

(Becomes the SQL SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Coordinates where x > y)

Let's delete all that aren't positive for both X and Y

using(var db = new OurDataContext(connString))
{
  var tab = db.Coordinates;
  tab.DeleteAllOnSubmit(tab.Where(co => co.X < 0 || co.Y < 0));
  db.SubmitChanges();
}

And so on, and so forth. The really useful queries are those where we are joining multiple tables and selecting subsets based on criteria, and then adapting them into anonymous objects containing the information we care about on the state of the entire database.

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The problem is I have a Linq-entity which contains columns X and Y so for every new Point I would have to create a separate table? Or is it possible to add rows to a sql table for every coordinate point? –  Prot Aug 25 '12 at 15:25
1  
You'd just have a table like: create table CartesianCoordinates(x int not null, y int not null) and perhaps some other fields like if you wanted to give different records an id (which should be the primary key, otherwise the x and y should) or a field that indicated what that particular set of points was for. E.g. a project of mine has a table that looks a bit like create table region(id int identity primary key, int destinationID, latitude decimal(9, 6), longitude decimal(9, 6)) where id lets me more easily update or remove and, the next ids the use, and then there's coords. –  Jon Hanna Aug 25 '12 at 15:33
    
Doesnt that mean that I am only able to store two points per table? If i write table.X = 22 and table.Y = 10 the table is full isn't it? So would have to create another table for another pair of coordinates? –  Prot Aug 25 '12 at 15:40
    
I suppose what I need is some kind of bulk copy which is not possible with LINQ –  Prot Aug 25 '12 at 15:57
1  
No, with the above I'm able to store 4 billion coordinates, and if that ever proved too few I could quickly change it to allow 15 quintillion (it's the id that limits this, not the x and y, with just those I've no limit). –  Jon Hanna Aug 25 '12 at 16:05

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