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I have derived an exception class from std::runtime_error in order to add support for streaming to exceptions. I am getting a strange compiler error output with clang that I'm not sure how to resolve?

clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ -g -Wall -I../ -I/usr/local/include Main.cpp -c
Main.cpp:43:19: error: call to deleted constructor of 'EarthException'
            throw EarthException(__FILE__, __LINE__)
                  ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
../EarthException.hpp:9:12: note: function has been explicitly marked deleted here
    struct EarthException : public Exception<EarthException>


template <typename TDerived>
    class Exception : public std::runtime_error
    {
        public:
            Exception() : std::runtime_error("") {}

            Exception(const std::string& file, const unsigned line)
                 : std::runtime_error("")
            { 
                stream_ << (file.empty() ? "UNNAMED_FILE" : file) << "[" << line << "]: ";
            }

            virtual ~Exception() {}

            template <typename T>
            TDerived& operator<<(const T& t)
            {
                stream_ << t;
                return static_cast<TDerived&>(*this);
            }

            virtual const char* what() const throw()
            {
                return stream_.str().c_str();
            }

       private:
           std::stringstream stream_;
    };

    struct EarthException : public Exception<EarthException>
    {
        EarthException() {}

        EarthException(const std::string& file, const unsigned line)
            : Exception<EarthException>(file, line) {}

        virtual ~EarthException() {}
    };
}

UPDATE:

I've now added explicit calls to std::runtime_error("") as it was pointed out the default constructor on this was marked as =delete however the error remains.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because of the user-declared destructors in Exception and EarthException, implicit generation of the move constructor and move assignment operators for these classes is disabled. And because of the move-only data member std::stringstream, implicit copy members are deleted.

However all of that is a distraction.

Your what member is doomed:

        virtual const char* what() const throw()
        {
            return stream_.str().c_str();
        }

This creates an rvalue std::string and then returns a pointer into that temporary. The temporary destructs before the client can ever read the pointer into that temporary.

What you need to do is pass a std::string down to the std::runtime_error base class. Then you don't need to hold a stringstream, or any other data member. The only tricky part is initializing the std::runtime_error base class with the proper string:

template <typename TDerived>
    class Exception : public std::runtime_error
    {
            static
            std::string
            init(const std::string& file, const unsigned line)
            {
                std::ostringstream os;
                os << (file.empty() ? "UNNAMED_FILE" : file) << "[" << line << "]: ";
                return os.str();
            }
        public:
            Exception(const std::string& file, const unsigned line)
                : std::runtime_error(init(file, line))
            { 
            }

      private:
          <del>std::stringstream stream_;</del>

Now you'll get implicit copy members and things will just work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, very insightful. One problem though is I can no longer stream to the class which was my original intent. Wouldn't holding std::stringstream by a std::unique_ptr solve the problem? – Graeme Aug 25 '12 at 17:00
    
If you want the exception to be move-only, there's no need to introduce unique_ptr. stringstream is also move-only. You can think of it as its own unique_ptr. But I think you'll also need to store a std::string (in addition to that in runtime_error. Since what must return a const char*, that pointer must point to something permanent (like a data member). You can't have it point into a temporary. In a nutshell, design the what first, and then do whatever is necessary to support that what. – Howard Hinnant Aug 25 '12 at 17:05
    
Yes, thanks, I fully understand the issue with returning a const char* to a temporary, that was an oversight on my part! I'm still not entirely clear why it's not compiling if std::stringstream is move only, I assume my class isn't move only in which case I presume I need to provide a move constructor and operator=? – Graeme Aug 25 '12 at 17:09
    
Yes, you need to provide your own move members if desired. The user-declared destructors inhibit the compiler from supplying these. And I don't believe you'll be able to explicitly default them at this time, though you may be able to in the future. There's a language issue under discussion on committee on this part: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_active.html#1402 – Howard Hinnant Aug 25 '12 at 17:34
    
You are correct, even by removing destructors from the class definition the compiler error remains. Thanks for assistance. – Graeme Aug 25 '12 at 17:48
Exception(const std::string& file, const unsigned line)
            { 
                stream_ << (file.empty() ? "UNNAMED_FILE" : file) << "[" << line << "]: ";
            }

This constructor does not call its base constructor, so the compiler generates a call to the default constructor, std::runtime_error::runtime_error(). But std::runtime_error does not have a default constructor, which is what the error message is telling you. To fix this, read about std::runtime_error and call one of its constructors.

EDIT: okay, here's the real problem (not that what I address above isn't a problem, too): the template Exception has a data member of type std::stringstream; streams cannot be copied, so the compiler can't generate a copy constructor to use for the throw.

share|improve this answer
    
Incidentally, the stuff about "deleted" is a C++11-ism; apparently the default constructor for std::runtime_error is marked with = delete, which tells the compiler not to generate it, even if it otherwise would. Looks like the error message got a bit tangled up... – Pete Becker Aug 25 '12 at 15:35
    
I've now added explicit calls to std::runtime_error("") but still see the error message :( – Graeme Aug 25 '12 at 15:41
    
Spot on, brilliant thanks! – Graeme Aug 25 '12 at 16:56

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