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I have been trying to use this code:

if (iteration % pow(256.0, 7) == 0) {

in one of my programs, but the error console says:

error C2297: '%' : illegal, right operand has type 'double'

How can I get around this error?

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What type is iteration ? –  Paul R Aug 25 '12 at 15:45
    
it's unsigned __int64. –  user1546083 Aug 25 '12 at 15:46
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you state in your title, the answer is to cast the result to an integer:

if (iteration % static_cast<int>(pow(256.0, 7)) == 0) 
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Since pow(256.0, 7) is representable as an integer you should probably just define it as an appropriate const, e.g.

const int64_t pow_256_7 = 1LL << (8 * 7);  // 256^7

and then do the test like this:

if ((iteration % pow_256_7) == 0)
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It's representable as an integer but probably not an int, so either 1 or 8*7 should be cast to int64_t or an appropriate suffix used. –  user786653 Aug 25 '12 at 16:19
    
The initializer should be 1ULL << (8 * 7) to avoid overflow when int is smaller than 64 bits. –  Pete Becker Aug 25 '12 at 16:19
    
Thanks both - fixed now. –  Paul R Aug 25 '12 at 17:04
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iteration % pow(256.0, 7)

Here pow returns double. But % cannot be applied on double (or float) types.

% can be applied only on intergral types such as int, short, char, etc.

How can I get around this error?

What are you trying to achieve? Maybe you can do this:

iteration % static_cast<__int64>(pow(256.0, 7))

Or simply this:

const __int64 value = 256ULL * 256 *256 *256 *256 *256 *256;

if ( iteration % value  == 0 ) 
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Is there a way of casting the value returned by pow to an integer? –  user1546083 Aug 25 '12 at 15:46
    
I believe that pow() with casting may be actually faster than that multiplication. Not to mention it will be more readable. In any case, compiler will optimize that. –  Michał Górny Aug 25 '12 at 16:00
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@MichałGórny: Why do you believe that? The compiler will do the multiplication at the compile time itself, no? –  Nawaz Aug 25 '12 at 16:04
    
The multiplication can overflow when int doesn't hold 64 bits. Change the first 256 to 256ULL. –  Pete Becker Aug 25 '12 at 16:21
    
@PeteBecker: Ohh. Good point. thanks. :-) –  Nawaz Aug 25 '12 at 16:23
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