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First, I apologize if this just a coding style issue. I'm wondering about the pros and cons of assign a new variable for each property or function to just to re-assign an existing variable. This is assuming you don't need access to the variable beyond the scope.

Here's what I mean (noting that the names $var0,... are just for simplicity), Option#1:

$var0= array('hello', 'world');
$var1="hello world";
$var2=//some crazy large database query result
$var3=//some complicated function()

vs. Option#2:

$var0= array('hello', 'world');
$var0="hello world";
$var0=//some crazy large database query result
$var0=//some complicated function()
  1. Does it depend on the memory size of the existing variable? I.e., is re-assigning memory more computationally expensive that assigning a new variable?
  2. Is this always a scope issue, meaning you should use Option#2 only if you don't need each of the variable values outside the scope shown here?
  3. Does it depend on what each variable value is? Does re-assigning to different data types have different costs associated with it?
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2  
Premature optimization... –  Jared Farrish Aug 25 '12 at 15:58
1  
Using new/reusing exiting variables will have no measurable impact on the performance of your code. It is the wrong thing to focus on when thinking about how to name your variables. This is not how optimization is done... If you're worried about the unmeasurable amount of cycles you will save one way or another, you'll miss the larger actually important optimizations like choosing the right algorithm. –  meagar Aug 25 '12 at 16:01
1  
From your example, $var2=//some crazy large database query result: In this statement, the "crazy large database query" will be trillions of times more expensive than allocating space for a new variable. This is absolutely not something which is relevant to optimizing software. No amount of time spent optimizing variable allocations will make up for 5 minutes spent optimizing that large query. –  meagar Aug 25 '12 at 16:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Personally I would say you should never ever reassign a variable to contain different stuff. This makes it really hard to debug. If you are worried about memory consumption you can always unset() variables.

Also note that you should never ever have variables names $var#. Your variablenames should describe what it holds.

In the end of the day it's all about minimizing the number of WTFs inyour code. And option two is one big WTF.

Does it depend on the memory size of the existing variable? I.e., is re-assigning memory more computationally expensive that assigning a new variable?

It's about limiting the number of WTFs for both you and other people (re)viewing your code.

Is this always a scope issue, meaning you should use Option#2 only if you don't need each of the variable values outside the scope shown here?

Well if it is in a totally other scope it is fine if you use the same name multiple names. As long as it is clear what the variabel contains, e.g.:

// perfectly fine to use the same name again. I would go as far as to say this is prefered.
function doSomethingWithText($articleText)
{
    // do something
}

$articleText = 'Some text of some article';
doSomethingWithText($articleText);

Does it depend on what each variable value is? Does re-assigning to different data types have different costs associated with it?

Not a matter of cost, but a matter of maintainability. Which is often way more important.

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-@PeeHaa, thanks, your comments are about limiting confusion of the programmer. Assuming zero confusion with either scenario, is re-assigning better? –  tim peterson Aug 25 '12 at 16:00
2  
The only thing you should consider is whether you're introducing confusion. Neither way is "better" if you ignore confusion. There is no optimization to be gained from reusing variables. That is the absolute wrong thing to worry about when building software in PHP. Make your code maintainable. If, after you have written your code, you find that parts of it are slow, optimize them. Do not optimize them by reusing variable names, that is not an optimization. –  meagar Aug 25 '12 at 16:02
1  
If you are are talking about performance I have to say: don't think about it. I really doubt it would matter. Even if you would have performance issues in your application it will almost never be the bottleneck. –  PeeHaa Aug 25 '12 at 16:03

Technically speaking, reusing variables would be (insignificantly) faster. It will make zero difference in measurable performance though.

While hardware gets cheaper and hours get more expensive, you should rather look to have maintainable code. This will save yourself headaches and your company hard dollars in the long run.

Only optimize where enough performance gain can be made to offset the amount of work (money) you are putting into it.

Nowadays of clouds and server clusters, a-bit-less-optimized code will most likely not make for a slower project in the end. It is more probable that your project will run just as fast, but will take a few more cpu cycles, and therefore cost you a little bit more money to your hosting provider. This minor added cost though, will most likely not weigh up to hours of optimizing for performance gain. Unless, ofcourse, you're asking this because you're developing for Amazon. (and even at places like Amazon, with millions and millions of hits per day, reusing variables will not result any noticable performance gain)

To get back to your question; I believe you should only reuse a variable when it will hold updated content of the original state. But in general, that doesn't happen too much.

I think in the following situation, reusing the $content var is the logical choice to make

function getContent()
{
    $cacheId = 'someUniqueCacheIdSoItDoesNotTriggerANotice';
    $content = someCacheLoadingCall( $cacheId );

    if (null === $content) {
        $content = someContentGeneratingFunction();

        someCacheSavingCall( $cacheId, $content);
    }

    return $content;
}

Descriptive code

Also, please be kind to your future self to always use descriptive names for your variables. You will thank yourself for it. When you then make the pact with yourself to never reuse variables unless it logically makes sense, you've made another step towards maintainable code.

Imagine, that in 6 months from now, after you've done another big project - or a more small projects - you get a call from an important client that there is a bug in the old project. Holy !@#! Gotta fix that right now! You open up and see functions like this everywhere;

function gC()
{
    $cI = 'someUniqueCacheIdSoItDoesNotTriggerANotice';
    $c  = sclc( $cI );

    if (null === $c) {
        $c = scg_f();
        scsc( $cI, $c);
    }

    return $c;
}

Much better to use descriptive variable and function names and to get a code editor with good code completion so you're still coding as fast as you want. Right now, I would recommend Aptana Studio or Zend Studio, Zend has a little bit better code completion, but Aptana has proven to be more stable.

PS. I don't know your level of programming, sorry if I babbled on too far. If not relevant for you, I hope to have helped someone else who might read this :)

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-@Maurice, thanks for the real world example –  tim peterson Aug 25 '12 at 16:05
1  
I wish I could vote twice for "optimize where gain-vs-work makes sense". So many wasted hours are spent on this kind of non-optimization... –  meagar Aug 25 '12 at 16:11

You should never use option #2. Reusing variables for unrelated blocks of code is a terrible practice. You shouldn't even be in a situation where option #2 is possible. If your function is so long that you're changing context completely and working on some different problem, you should refactor your function into smaller single-purpose functions.

You should never reuse a variable out of some desire to "recycle" them after the old value is no longer used. If a variable is no longer it should naturally fall out of scope if you're architecturing your software correctly. Your decision should have nothing to do with performance or memory-optimization, neither of which are affected by the naming of your variables. Your only consideration when picking variable names should be producing maintainable, stable code.

The fact that you're even asking yourself whether to reuse your variables means you're using names which are too generic. Variable names like var0,var1 etc are terrible. You should be naming your variables according to what they actually contain, and declaring a new variable when you need to store a new value.

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