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What is the best (cleanest, most efficient) way to write saturating addition in C?

The function or macro should add two unsigned inputs (need both 16- and 32-bit versions) and return all-bits-one (0xFFFF or 0xFFFFFFFF) if the sum overflows.

Target is x86 and ARM using gcc (4.1.2) and Visual Studio (for simulation only, so a fallback implementation is OK there).

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12 Answers 12

up vote 19 down vote accepted

In plain C:

uint16_t sadd16(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
    { return (a > 0xFFFF - b) ? 0xFFFF : a + b; }

uint32_t sadd32(uint32_t a, uint32_t b)
    { return (a > 0xFFFFFFFF - b) ? 0xFFFFFFFF : a + b;}

which is almost macro-ized and directly conveys the meaning.

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6  
Nice. A nitpick--if I saw the name sadd16 in some code, my first assumption would be that the s stands for signed. –  Craig McQueen Jul 3 '10 at 12:51
    
@Craig McQueen Except for the fact that there would not be much reason to make it a function. –  yingted May 10 '11 at 21:32
    
@Anonymous: Why not? Signed overflow/underflow isn't defined. –  Joseph Garvin Mar 19 '12 at 22:01
    
@JosephGarvin Signed addition of unsigned ints? –  yingted Mar 24 '12 at 21:14
    
@Anonymous: Craig is speaking from the standpoint of reading code where there is a call to sad16/32. You won't see the signature unless you find and open the header. –  Joseph Garvin Mar 26 '12 at 15:18

Using C++ you could write a more flexible variant of Remo.D's solution:

template<typename T>
T sadd(T first, T second)
{
    static_assert(std::is_integral<T>::value, "sadd is not defined for non-integral types");
    return first > std::numeric_limits<T>::max() - second ? std::numeric_limits<T>::max() : first + second;
}

This can be easily translated to C - using the limits defined in limits.h. Please also note that the Fixed width integer types might not been available on your system.

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In IA32 without conditional jumps:

uint32_t sadd32(uint32_t a, uint32_t b)
{
#if defined IA32
  __asm
  {
    mov eax,a
    xor edx,edx
    add eax,b
    setnc dl
    dec edx
    or eax,edx
  }
#elif defined ARM
  // ARM code
#else
  // non-IA32/ARM way, copy from above
#endif
}
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The question asked for C, but anyway, nice code. Is eax returned by default as the function result? –  tzot Sep 23 '08 at 14:36
4  
If the question wanted portability, it shouldn't have specified x86 and ARM ;-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 23 '08 at 14:40
1  
That function is still portable - once the elif and else cases are filled in. Portable code doesn't mean that you can't optimise for particular platforms. –  Arafangion May 18 '10 at 2:53
1  
A proposed edit by YumeYao (which I've not pushed through, as it changes the nature of the answer): The 3 instructions (xor reg,reg; setne reg; dec reg;) can be replaced with one more efficient instruction (sbb reg,reg). –  Marc Gravell Aug 22 '11 at 8:13
    
Two things: the __asm keyword is compiler-dependent. The standard doesn't specify a keyword for inline assembly. So this is not portable in the sense that it is compiler-dependent. For example, the Intel C++ compiler is Windows only, so if you wrote portable code utilizing Itel C++ features, it wouldn't be portable. Another thing: inline assembly prevents compiler inlining. So this optimization doesn't really help if there is still the function call overhead... –  Cole Johnson Jun 16 '13 at 21:51

Zero branch solution:

uint32_t sadd32(uint32_t a, uint32_t b)
{
    uint64_t s = (uint64_t)a+b;
    return -(s>>32) | (uint32_t)s;
}

A good compiler will optimize this to avoid doing any actual 64-bit arithmetic (s>>32 will merely be the carry flag, and -(s>>32) is the result of sbb %eax,%eax).

In x86 asm (AT&T syntax, a and b in eax and ebx, result in eax):

add %eax,%ebx
sbb %eax,%eax
or %ebx,%eax

8- and 16-bit versions should be obvious. Signed version might require a bit more work.

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You probably want portable C code here, which your compiler will turn into proper ARM assembly. ARM has conditional moves, and these can be conditional on overflow. The algorithm then becomes add, and conditionally set the destination to unsigned(-1) if overflow was detected.

In code:

uint16_t add16(uint16_t a, uint16_t b) { uint16_t c = a + b; if (c<a) /* Can only happen due to overflow */ { c = uint16_t(-1); } return c; }

Note that this differs from the other algorithms in that it corrects overflow, instead of relying on another calculation to detect overflow.

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If you care about performance, you really want to do this sort of stuff in SIMD, where x86 has native saturating arithmetic.

Because of this lack of saturating arithmetic in scalar math, one can get cases in which operations done on 4-variable-wide SIMD is more than 4 times faster than the equivalent C (and correspondingly true with 8-variable-wide SIMD):

sub8x8_dct8_c: 1332 clocks
sub8x8_dct8_mmx: 182 clocks
sub8x8_dct8_sse2: 127 clocks
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1  
Is using the SSE instructions still faster in cases where you're only ever operating on one variable at a time? –  Joseph Garvin Mar 19 '12 at 16:05

The best performance will usually involve inline assembly (as some have already stated).

But for portable C, these functions only involve one comparison and no type-casting (and thus I believe optimal):

unsigned saturate_add_uint(unsigned x, unsigned y)
{
    if (y>UINT_MAX-x) return UINT_MAX;
    return x+y;
}

unsigned short saturate_add_ushort(unsigned short x, unsigned short y)
{
    if (y>USHRT_MAX-x) return USHRT_MAX;
    return x+y;
}

As macros, they become:

SATURATE_ADD_UINT(x, y) (((y)>UINT_MAX-(x)) ? UINT_MAX : ((x)+(y)))
SATURATE_ADD_USHORT(x, y) (((y)>SHRT_MAX-(x)) ? USHRT_MAX : ((x)+(y)))

I leave versions for 'unsigned long' and 'unsigned long long' as an exercise to the reader. ;-)

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I'm not sure if this is faster than Skizz's solution (always profile), but here's an alternative no-branch assembly solution. Note that this requires the conditional move (CMOV) instruction, which I'm not sure is available on your target.


uint32_t sadd32(uint32_t a, uint32_t b)
{
    __asm
    {
    	movl eax, a
    	addl eax, b
    	movl edx, 0xffffffff
    	cmovc eax, edx
    }
}
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2  
ARM has "C-everything". Not just jump and move. But it doesn't have support for 32 bits constants. So you'd want a conditional mov 0, followed by a conditional sub 1 –  MSalters Oct 3 '08 at 11:17

In ARM you may already have saturated arithmetic built-in. The ARMv5 DSP-extensions can saturate registers to any bit-length. Also on ARM saturation is usually cheap because you can excute most instructions conditional.

ARMv6 even has saturated addition, subtraction and all the other stuff for 32 bits and packed numbers.

On the x86 you get saturated arithmetic either via MMX or SSE.

All this needs assembler, so it's not what you've asked for.

There are C-tricks to do saturated arithmetic as well. This little code does saturated addition on four bytes of a dword. It's based on the idea to calculate 32 half-adders in parallel, e.g. adding numbers without carry overflow.

This is done first. Then the carries are calculated, added and replaced with a mask if the addition would overflow.

uint32_t SatAddUnsigned8(uint32_t x, uint32_t y) 
{
  uint32_t signmask = 0x80808080;
  uint32_t t0 = (y ^ x) & signmask;
  uint32_t t1 = (y & x) & signmask;
  x &= ~signmask;
  y &= ~signmask;
  x += y;
  t1 |= t0 & x;
  t1 = (t1 << 1) - (t1 >> 7);
  return (x ^ t0) | t1;
}

You can get the same for 16 bits (or any kind of bit-field) by changing the signmask constant and the shifts at the bottom like this:

uint32_t SatAddUnsigned16(uint32_t x, uint32_t y) 
{
  uint32_t signmask = 0x80008000;
  uint32_t t0 = (y ^ x) & signmask;
  uint32_t t1 = (y & x) & signmask;
  x &= ~signmask;
  y &= ~signmask;
  x += y;
  t1 |= t0 & x;
  t1 = (t1 << 1) - (t1 >> 15);
  return (x ^ t0) | t1;
}

uint32_t SatAddUnsigned32 (uint32_t x, uint32_t y)
{
  uint32_t signmask = 0x80000000;
  uint32_t t0 = (y ^ x) & signmask;
  uint32_t t1 = (y & x) & signmask;
  x &= ~signmask;
  y &= ~signmask;
  x += y;
  t1 |= t0 & x;
  t1 = (t1 << 1) - (t1 >> 31);
  return (x ^ t0) | t1;
}

Above code does the same for 16 and 32 bit values.

If you don't need the feature that the functions add and saturate multiple values in parallel just mask out the bits you need. On ARM you also want to change the signmask constant because ARM can't load all possible 32 bit constants in a single cycle.

Edit: The parallel versions are most likely slower than the straight forward methods, but they are faster if you have to saturate more than one value at a time.

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I suppose, the best way for x86 is to use inline assembler to check overflow flag after addition. Something like:

add eax, ebx
jno @@1
or eax, 0FFFFFFFFh
@@1:
.......

It's not very portable, but IMHO the most efficient way.

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I think the answer for ARM is similar (and even more efficient with conditional ops), but I'm hoping someone knows a pattern that will trick GCC into generating something close to this. –  Frank Szczerba Sep 23 '08 at 14:26
    
@Frank, which GCC versin are you using? (gcc --version). The newer versions do such tricks. –  Nils Pipenbrinck Sep 23 '08 at 14:31
    
@Nils: It's gcc 4.1.2. –  Frank Szczerba Sep 23 '08 at 14:48

The current implementation we are using is:

#define sadd16(a, b)  (uint16_t)( ((uint32_t)(a)+(uint32_t)(b)) > 0xffff ? 0xffff : ((a)+(b)))
#define sadd32(a, b)  (uint32_t)( ((uint64_t)(a)+(uint64_t)(b)) > 0xffffffff ? 0xffffffff : ((a)+(b)))
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2  
lower-case function macros? Evil! –  Arafangion May 18 '10 at 2:55
    
you must not do a lot of Linux kernel work :-) –  Frank Szczerba Aug 10 '10 at 17:08
uint32_t saturate_add32(uint32_t a, uint32_t b)
{
    uint32_t sum = a + b;
    if ((sum < a) || (sum < b))
        return ~((uint32_t)0);
    else
        return sum;
} /* saturate_add32 */

uint16_t saturate_add16(uint16_t a, uint16_t b)
{
    uint16_t sum = a + b;
    if ((sum < a) || (sum < b))
        return ~((uint16_t)0);
    else
        return sum;
} /* saturate_add16 */

Edit: Now that you've posted your version, I'm not sure mine is any cleaner/better/more efficient/more studly.

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Your answer looks like what I thought we should be doing, but like you said I'm not really sure which is better, which is why I figured I'd open it up to voting here. –  Frank Szczerba Sep 23 '08 at 14:23
    
They both seem correct, therefore efficiency should decide. An extra comparison isn't obviously slower (or faster) than oversizing the addition. Do some efficiency tests for both solutions on both architectures and pick the faster one. –  Rafał Dowgird Sep 23 '08 at 14:27
    
Is checking the sum against both inputs necessary? The limit case is (uint16_t)(0xffff + 1) which is both < 1 and < 0xffff, so it seems the second check can be avoided. –  Frank Szczerba Sep 23 '08 at 15:05
    
You are right, the lost overflow bit is worth MAXINT+1, so the result of overflown addition is equal to a+b-(MAXINT+1), which is both less than a and less than b. –  Rafał Dowgird Sep 23 '08 at 20:07
    
Why use ~((uint32_t)0)? You're already including <limits.h> to get the uint32_t deceleration, so why not just use UINT32_MAX? –  Cole Johnson Jun 16 '13 at 21:52

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