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How is it possible to call toString method using the reference variable of interface My, which does not have a toString method?

interface My
{
    void show();
    String toHi();
}
class C implements My
{
    public void show(){
        System.out.println("show\n");
    }
    public String toString(){
        return "HELLO"; 
    }
    public String toHi(){
        return "Hi";    
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        My m=new C();
        String s=m.toString();
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
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What happened when you tried it? Alternatively, how would you construct an implementation of the interface that didn't extend Object? –  EJP Aug 25 '12 at 18:09
    
actully i want to know that how toString() method called by an interface reference variable m. –  Akhilesh Aug 25 '12 at 18:14
    
Because, as I hinted, you can't construct an implementation of the interface that doesn't extend Object. So any implementation declares or inherits a toString() method, so you can call it. –  EJP Aug 26 '12 at 8:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The the Java Documentation says...

When an interface has no direct SuperInterface, it will create abstract public method for all those public methods present in the Object class.

This is why you are able to call the toString() method on the interface reference

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if it default created a abstract public methods.. why are we not forced to implement the method in the concrete class which implements it???.. it does not give out any compilation exception.!!! in Short Interface A has override toString() from object. Class B implements IA. shouldn't class implement toString() ?? –  Punith Raj Aug 29 '13 at 11:11

Object has a toString() method, so everything (except primitive types) has a toString() method. Java will treat anything, even an empty interface, as having all the methods of Object, because it always does.

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But,it is not written in java documentation that an interface extends an Object class. Class Object is the root of the class hierarchy. Every class has Object as a superclass. All objects, including arrays, implement the methods of this class. and let say, if an interface extends Object class so what about non abstract method which is defined in Object class.. and as i know that an interface can only extends interfaces, but here Object is not an interface.... ??? –  Akhilesh Aug 25 '12 at 17:36
    
The op means how the toString() method was called on Interface reference... Interface never extends Object class.... –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Aug 25 '12 at 17:36
    
@AkhileshDharDubey see my answer –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Aug 25 '12 at 17:37
1  
@AkhileshDharDubey Interfaces don't extend classes—that's not possible. Java has a specific special case where an interface that doesn't extend any other interface implicitly includes all the methods on Object. And it is documented. –  John Calsbeek Aug 25 '12 at 17:40
    
@John Calsbeek you are right at this...but the situation in which it does is in my answer... –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Aug 25 '12 at 17:42

Any Object has a toString() method. Anything that would implement an interface will implicitly extend Object, so will also have a toString() method.

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Class C implements My but it also extends Object, as all objects eventually do in their inheritance tree.

The Object class does have the method toString(), along with a number of others.

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The reason that you are able to invoke that method through that variable of your interfce is because of a special treatment in case of interfaces in Java.

Even though the method is not explicitly declared in the interface, the special treatment implicitly provides declarations for all the public instance methods defined in the class Object. And the toString method is one of them.

But, note that interfaces don't implicitly extend any super interface (or class) unlike classes which implicitly extend the Object class.

You will find a better explanation here - Do Interfaces really inherit the Object class in Java? .

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You can't call for Interface toString() method because they only have the methods you declare.

But you can trick the system. Every object have a toString() method and it is obvious that your interface be implemented by class that extend object so you will have it too.

So you can do some thing like that:

public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        My m=new C();
        String s= m + ""; // the toString() of the C class will be called here
        System.out.println(s);
    }
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Since class C implicitly extends class Object, it inherits method toString. And since that's not an abstract method, class C is not forced to provide an implementation, although you're able to directly invoke toString on an instance of C. For more information, please see Lesson: Interfaces and Inheritance.

As stated in the Object API,

Class Object is the root of the class hierarchy. Every class has Object as a superclass. All objects, including arrays, implement the methods of this class.

Also, note that the toString method is not part of the interface definition, but rather the Object class definition.

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Every Object(except primitive types) in java has a toString() method.

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primitive types are not objects (and you forgot to mention that interfaces are not objects either) –  mre Aug 25 '12 at 18:30

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