Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to do a angle class to be initialized in radians or degrees but i don't know if it is a good idea. I'm thinking about something like this:

Class Diagram

class Radian;
class Degree;

/**
  * My angle class.
  **/
class Angle
{
    private:
        float m_radian;

    public:
        explicit Angle(const Radian& rad);

        explicit Angle(const Degree& deg);

        float GetRadian(void) const
        {
            return this->m_radian;
        }

        float GetDegree(void) const
        {
            return ToDegree(this->m_radian);
        }

        bool IsEqual(const Angle& angle, float epsilon = 0.001f) const
        {
            return Abs<float>(this->m_radian - angle.m_radian) < epsilon;
        }

        void Set(const Angle& ang);

    protected:
        Angle(void) : m_radian(0.0f)
        {}

        Angle(float rad) : m_radian(rad)
        {}
};

class Radian : public Angle
{
    public:
        Radian(void)
        {}

        Radian(float r) : Angle(r)
        {}
};

class Degree : public Angle
{
    public:
        Degree(void)
        {}

        Degree(float d) : Angle(ToRadian(d))
        {}
};

/// Trigonometric functions.
float Sin(const Angle& angle);
...

This way i won't confuse radian and degrees in my code. But, is this a good idea or i should use other design?

share|improve this question
    
If you have an Angle class, why also have Degree and Radian? –  Beta Aug 25 '12 at 17:41
9  
You might want to look at Boost Units for inspiration on a rather different (and IMO, generally superior) approach to this problem. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 25 '12 at 17:41
1  
Personally, I think this triangle is a fun pattern which violates OO principles in a delightfully exciting way. I first saw it in Eiffel, with complex numbers, and I'm in love with it ever since. –  SáT Aug 25 '12 at 17:52
1  
@Beta My Angle class is a generalization. So, when i want to use a degree angle i can use Degree(90) instead of Angle(ToRadian(90)). I want a way to not confuse radians and degrees. Using just Angle, i can write something wrong like Angle(90). –  Lucas Nunes Aug 25 '12 at 17:54
2  
I think ideas like this are part of the reason why object-oriented ideas don't make a dent in serious scientific computing. I wouldn't consider unit conversions to be significant enough behavioral difference to warrant two new classes. –  duffymo Aug 25 '12 at 18:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I don't see the need for inheritance here. As far as using your class is concerned, all that matters is that you get an angle - whether it was in degrees or radians to start with is irrelevant.

Disclaimer: I've done this before. Exactly the same use case. My solution was to make the constructor take two arguments: a number and a unit enum. I'd use my class like so:

Angle a(1.2345, Angle::Radians);
std::cout << a.radians() << a.degrees() << sin(a);

If you want convenience methods to create angles from common units, they could be just that: helper methods. No need for separate classes.

Angle r = Radians(2.3);
Angle d = Degrees(180);

Anyway - just what I've been happy using in the past. Hope it helps!

share|improve this answer
    
That seems like a good solution too. But, in that case you must pass two parameters to initialize an Angle object. Is that bad if you need to load a lot of angles? And on constructor you have an "if" to handle with the angle kind? –  Lucas Nunes Aug 25 '12 at 18:36
1  
+1, inheritance is for modifying behaviour, and there isn't any difference in behaviour here to justify inheritance. –  casablanca Aug 25 '12 at 18:41
1  
@LucasNunes - You can avoid conditionals by making Angle::UNIT be a multiplier (or an index into a table of multipliers). So if you store your angle internally as radians, Angle:Radians would be 1.0, Angle::Degrees would be 0.0174532925, and so forth. –  Xavier Holt Aug 25 '12 at 19:11
1  
@LucasNunes - About having two arguments: I assume that a function like this will be inlined by compilers, as it's really very tiny, and that multiplication by 1 will be optimized out in the case where the input is in radians. But if you want to make extra sure radian initialization is fast, you've got options. You could use "named constructors", like Frerich suggests, or have a friend helper method that calls a private constructor with only one (radian) argument. In all other units, the multiplication is unavoidable. –  Xavier Holt Aug 25 '12 at 19:21

You don't need any inheritance at all here. Once the objects are constructed, you don't care about the difference anymore - they behave exactly the same. So the only problem you've got to solve is how to make constructing Angle objects in a readable way.

The usual solution to this is to use named constructors:

class Angle
{
    public:
        static Angle fromRadians( float v );
        static Angle fromDegrees( float v );
        // ...

    private:
        Angle( float rad );
        // ...
};

Instead of invoking the constructor directly, you provide factory functions which expressive names. So you write:

void f( Angle::fromDegrees( 3.0 ), Angle::fromRadians( 17.0 ) );
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Exactly right. There's no need for two classes here. No one who's ever done scientific computing would do such a thing. –  duffymo Aug 25 '12 at 20:45

I would suggest this:

class Radians {
    explicit Radians(float a) : angle_(a) {}
    Radians(Degrees a)        : angle_(a * PI/180.f) {}
    operator float()          { return angle_; }
private:
    float angle_;
}

class Degrees {
    explicit Degrees(float a) : angle_(a) {}
    Degrees(Radians a)        : angle_(a * 180.f/PI) {}
    operator float()          { return angle_; }
private:
    float angle_;
}

This forces the natural units of a function to be part of its interface, which I consider to be a good thing. You should never write a Sin function that checks what kind of angle it was given, and does a different calculation. Either you write two versions, and let the compiler do the work:

float Sin(Radians x);
float Sin(Degrees x);

Or you just write one (using whatever type the implementation needs—probably radians):

float Sin(Radians x);

The point is not that you can have an "abstract" angle (which I don't believe is a useful concept), the point is to avoid ever confusing degrees with radians and to make the conversion between the two implicit.

Having a abstract base Angle class increases syntactic noise (you need to use references everywhere) and will probably decrease performance. This solution also allows you to store your angles in your desired units, instead of hoping that you're getting the "fast path."

share|improve this answer

I would use the angle as object and degree and radian as different getter setter for the same internal angle value.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.