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What are some hidden features of SQL Server?

For example, undocumented system stored procedures, tricks to do things which are very useful but not documented enough?


Answers

Thanks to everybody for all the great answers!

Stored Procedures

  • sp_msforeachtable: Runs a command with '?' replaced with each table name (v6.5 and up)
  • sp_msforeachdb: Runs a command with '?' replaced with each database name (v7 and up)
  • sp_who2: just like sp_who, but with a lot more info for troubleshooting blocks (v7 and up)
  • sp_helptext: If you want the code of a stored procedure, view & UDF
  • sp_tables: return a list of all tables and views of database in scope.
  • sp_stored_procedures: return a list of all stored procedures
  • xp_sscanf: Reads data from the string into the argument locations specified by each format argument.
  • xp_fixeddrives:: Find the fixed drive with largest free space
  • sp_help: If you want to know the table structure, indexes and constraints of a table. Also views and UDFs. Shortcut is Alt+F1

Snippets

  • Returning rows in random order
  • All database User Objects by Last Modified Date
  • Return Date Only
  • Find records which date falls somewhere inside the current week.
  • Find records which date occurred last week.
  • Returns the date for the beginning of the current week.
  • Returns the date for the beginning of last week.
  • See the text of a procedure that has been deployed to a server
  • Drop all connections to the database
  • Table Checksum
  • Row Checksum
  • Drop all the procedures in a database
  • Re-map the login Ids correctly after restore
  • Call Stored Procedures from an INSERT statement
  • Find Procedures By Keyword
  • Drop all the procedures in a database
  • Query the transaction log for a database programmatically.

Functions

  • HashBytes()
  • EncryptByKey
  • PIVOT command

Misc

  • Connection String extras
  • TableDiff.exe
  • Triggers for Logon Events (New in Service Pack 2)
  • Boosting performance with persisted-computed-columns (pcc).
  • DEFAULT_SCHEMA setting in sys.database_principles
  • Forced Parameterization
  • Vardecimal Storage Format
  • Figuring out the most popular queries in seconds
  • Scalable Shared Databases
  • Table/Stored Procedure Filter feature in SQL Management Studio
  • Trace flags
  • Number after a GO repeats the batch
  • Security using schemas
  • Encryption using built in encryption functions, views and base tables with triggers
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locked by Robert Harvey Mar 10 '12 at 3:40

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

4  
If known, it would be nice to include the applicable versions with each answer. (2000 and up, 2005, 2000 only, etc.) – bill weaver Sep 1 '09 at 18:37

84 Answers 84

did you ever accidentally click on Execute button when u actually wanted to click on :
Debug / Parse / Use Database / Switch between query tabs / etc. ?

Here is a way to move that button someplace safe:

Tools -> Customize . and drag button where you want

You can also :
- add/remove other buttons which are commonly used/unused (applies even to commands within MenuBar like File/Edit)
- change icon image of button (see the tiny pig under Change Button Image.. lol)

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I would like to recommend a free add-in SSMS Tools Pack which has got bunch of features such as

Code Snippets

You don't need to type SELECT * FROM on your own anymore. Just type SSF and hit enter (which can be customized to any other key. I prefer Tab). Few other useful snippets are

SSC + tab - SELECT COUNT(*) FROM

SST + tab - SELECT TOP 10 * FROM

S + tab - SELECT

I + tab - INSERT

U + tab - UPDATE

W + tab - WHERE

OB + tab - ORDER BY

and the list goes on. You can check and customize the entire list using SSMS Tools Pack Menu

Execution Log History

Have you ever realized that you could have saved an ad hoc query which you wrote few days back so that you don't need to reinvent the wheel again? SSMS Tools pack saves all your execution history and you can search based on date or any text in the query.

Search Database Data

This feature helps you to search for the occurence of the string in the entire database and displays the table name and column name with total number of occurences. You can use this feature by right clicking the database in object explorer and selecting Search Database Data.

Format SQL

Sets all keywords to uppercase or lowercase letters. Right click on query window and select Format Text. You can set the Shortcut key in SSMS Tools Menu. But it lacks alignment feature.

CRUD SP Generation

Right click a table, SSMS Tools - > Create CRUD to generate Insert, Update, Delete and Select SP. The content of the SP can be customized using SSMS Tools menu.

Misc

Few other features are

  1. Search results in the Grid mode.
  2. Generate Insert script from resultset, tables & database.
  3. Execution Plan Analyzer.
  4. Run one script in multiple databases.

For more information, you can visit their Features page

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@Gatekiller - An easier way to get just the Date is surely

CAST(CONVERT(varchar,getdate(),103) as datetime)

If you don't use DD/MM/YYYY in your locale, you'd need to use a different value from 103. Lookup CONVERT function in SQL Books Online for the locale codes.

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5  
The conversion via VARCHAR is much slower than "CAST(FLOOR(CAST(@DateTime AS FLOAT))AS DATETIME)" or "DateAdd(Day, 0, DateDiff(Day, 0, @DateTime))" (between 5 & 6 times as slow - c.f. sqlteam.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=35296#107617) and config dependant – Kristen Feb 16 '09 at 15:58

Forced Parameterization

  • Parameterization allows SQL Server to take advantage of query plan reuse and avoid compilation and optimization overheads on subsequent executions of similar queries. However there are many applications out there that, for one reason or another, still suffer from ad-hoc query compilation overhead. For those cases with high number of query compilation and where lowering CPU utilization and response time is critical for your workload, force parameterization can help.

Link

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A few of my favorite things:

Added in sp2 - Scripting options under tools/options/scripting

New security using schemas - create two schemas: user_access, admin_access. Put your user procs in one and your admin procs in the other like this: user_access.showList , admin_access.deleteUser . Grant EXECUTE on the schema to your app user/role. No more GRANTing EXECUTE all the time.

Encryption using built in encryption functions, views(to decrypt for presentation), and base tables with triggers(to encrypt on insert/update).

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Not undocumented

RowNumber courtesy of Itzik Ben-Gan http://www.sqlmag.com/article/articleid/97675/sql_server_blog_97675.html

SET XACT_ABORT ON rollback everything on error for transactions

all the sp_'s are helpful just browse books online

keyboard shortcuts I use all the time in management studio F6 - switch between results and query Alt+X or F5- run selected text in query if nothing is selected runs the entire window Alt+T and Alt+D - results in text or grid respectively

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Returing results based on a pipe delimited string of IDs in a single statmeent (alternative to passing xml or first turning the delimited string to a table)

Example:

DECLARE @nvcIDs nvarchar(max)
SET @nvcIDs = '|1|2|3|'

SELECT C.*
FROM tblCompany C
WHERE @nvcIDs LIKE '%|' + CAST(C.CompanyID as nvarchar) + '|%'
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1  
Don't ever do this on tables which are of any considerable size. – erikkallen Mar 26 '10 at 21:07

OK, here's my 2 cents:

http://dbalink.wordpress.com/2008/10/24/querying-the-object-catalog-and-information-schema-views/

I am too lazy to re-write the whole thing here, so please check my post. That may be trivial to many, but there will be some who will find it a "hidden gem".

EDIT:

After a while, I decided to add the code here so you don't have to jump to my blog to see the code.

SELECT  T.NAME AS [TABLE NAME], C.NAME AS [COLUMN NAME], P.NAME AS [DATA TYPE], P.MAX_LENGTH AS[SIZE],   CAST(P.PRECISION AS VARCHAR) +‘/’+ CAST(P.SCALE AS VARCHAR) AS [PRECISION/SCALE]
FROM ADVENTUREWORKS.SYS.OBJECTS AS T
JOIN ADVENTUREWORKS.SYS.COLUMNS AS C
ON T.OBJECT_ID=C.OBJECT_ID
JOIN ADVENTUREWORKS.SYS.TYPES AS P
ON C.SYSTEM_TYPE_ID=P.SYSTEM_TYPE_ID
WHERE T.TYPE_DESC=‘USER_TABLE’;

Or, if you want to pull all the User Tables altogether, use CURSOR like this:

DECLARE @tablename VARCHAR(60)

DECLARE cursor_tablenames CURSOR FOR
SELECT name FROM AdventureWorks.sys.tables

OPEN cursor_tablenames
FETCH NEXT FROM cursor_tablenames INTO @tablename

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN

SELECT  t.name AS [TABLE Name], c.name AS [COLUMN Name], p.name AS [DATA Type], p.max_length AS[SIZE],   CAST(p.PRECISION AS VARCHAR) +‘/’+ CAST(p.scale AS VARCHAR) AS [PRECISION/Scale]
FROM AdventureWorks.sys.objects AS t
JOIN AdventureWorks.sys.columns AS c
ON t.OBJECT_ID=c.OBJECT_ID
JOIN AdventureWorks.sys.types AS p
ON c.system_type_id=p.system_type_id
WHERE t.name = @tablename
AND t.type_desc=‘USER_TABLE’
ORDER BY t.name ASC

FETCH NEXT FROM cursor_tablenames INTO @tablename
END

CLOSE cursor_tablenames
DEALLOCATE cursor_tablenames

ADDITIONAL REFERENCE (my blog): http://dbalink.wordpress.com/2009/01/21/how-to-create-cursor-in-tsql/

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I use to add this stored procedure to the master db,

Improvements:

  • Trim on Host name, so the copy-paste works on VNC.
  • Added a LOCK option, for just watching what are the current locked processes.

Usage:

  • EXEC sp_who3 'ACTIVE'
  • EXEC sp_who3 'LOCK'
  • EXEC sp_who3 spid_No

That's it.

CREATE procedure sp_who3
       @loginame sysname = NULL --or 'active' or 'lock'
as

declare  @spidlow	int,
    	 @spidhigh	int,
    	 @spid		int,
    	 @sid		varbinary(85)

select   @spidlow	=     0
    	,@spidhigh	= 32767


if @loginame is not NULL begin
    if upper(@loginame) = 'ACTIVE' begin
    	select spid, ecid, status
    		, loginame=rtrim(loginame)
    		, hostname=rtrim(hostname)
    		, blk=convert(char(5),blocked)
    		, dbname = case
    						when dbid = 0 then null
    						when dbid <> 0 then db_name(dbid)
    					end
    		  ,cmd
    	from  master.dbo.sysprocesses
    	where spid >= @spidlow and spid <= @spidhigh AND
    		  upper(cmd) <> 'AWAITING COMMAND'
    	return (0)
    end
    if upper(@loginame) = 'LOCK' begin
    	select spid , ecid, status
    		, loginame=rtrim(loginame)
    		, hostname=rtrim(hostname)
    		, blk=convert(char(5),blocked)
    		, dbname = case
    						when dbid = 0 then null
    						when dbid <> 0 then db_name(dbid)
    					end
    		  ,cmd
    	from  master.dbo.sysprocesses
    	where spid >= 0 and spid <= 32767 AND
    		  upper(cmd) <> 'AWAITING COMMAND'
    	AND convert(char(5),blocked) > 0
    	return (0)
    end

end

if (@loginame is not NULL
   AND  upper(@loginame) <> 'ACTIVE'
   )
begin
    if (@loginame like '[0-9]%')	-- is a spid.
    begin
    	select @spid = convert(int, @loginame)
    	select spid, ecid, status
    		, loginame=rtrim(loginame)
    		, hostname=rtrim(hostname)
    		, blk=convert(char(5),blocked)
    		, dbname = case
    						when dbid = 0 then null
    						when dbid <> 0 then db_name(dbid)
    					end
    		  ,cmd
    	from  master.dbo.sysprocesses
    	where spid = @spid
    end
    else
    begin
    	select @sid = suser_sid(@loginame)
    	if (@sid is null)
    	begin
    		raiserror(15007,-1,-1,@loginame)
    		return (1)
    	end
    	select spid, ecid, status
    		, loginame=rtrim(loginame)
    		, hostname=rtrim(hostname)
    		, blk=convert(char(5),blocked)
    		, dbname = case
    						when dbid = 0 then null
    						when dbid <> 0 then db_name(dbid)
    					end
    		   ,cmd
    	from  master.dbo.sysprocesses
    	where sid = @sid
    end
    return (0)
end


/* loginame arg is null */
select spid,
       ecid,
       status
       , loginame=rtrim(loginame)
       , hostname=rtrim(hostname)
       , blk=convert(char(5),blocked)
       , dbname = case
    				when dbid = 0 then null
    				when dbid <> 0 then db_name(dbid)
    			end
       ,cmd
from  master.dbo.sysprocesses
where spid >= @spidlow and spid <= @spidhigh


return (0) -- sp_who
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CTRL-E executes the currently selected text in Query Analyzer.

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use db
go 

select o.name 
, (SELECT [definition] AS [text()] 
     FROM sys.all_sql_modules 
     WHERE sys.all_sql_modules.object_id=a.object_id 
     FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE
  )  AS Statement_Text
 , a.object_id
 , o.modify_date 

 FROM sys.all_sql_modules a 
 LEFT JOIN  sys.objects o ON a.object_id=o.object_id 
 ORDER BY  4 desc

--select * from sys.objects
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In SQL Server 2005 you no longer need to run the sp-blocker-pss80 stored procedure. Instead, you can do:

exec sp_configure 'show advanced options', 1;
reconfigure;
go
exec sp_configure 'blocked process threshold', 30;
reconfigure;

You can then start a SQL Trace and select the Blocked process report event class in the Errors and Warnings group. Details of that event here.

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I find sp_depends useful. It displays the objects which depend on a given object, e.g.

exec sp_depends 'fn_myFunction'

returns objects which depend on this function (note, if the objects have not originally been run into the database in the correct order this will give incorrect results.)

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1  
I've found sp_depends a bit unreliable in complex enterprise scenarios. – penderi Jun 30 '09 at 20:11

For SQL Server 2005:

select * from sys.dm_os_performance_counters

select * from sys.dm_exec_requests
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Use

select * from information_schema

to list out all the databases,base tables,sps,views etc in sql server.

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1  
How is this hidden? The information_schema view is part of the SQL 92 standard. – Hogan Jul 2 '10 at 13:20

Alternative to Kolten's sp_change_users_login:

ALTER USER wacom_app WITH LOGIN = wacom_app
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BCP_IN and BCP_OUT perfect for BULK data import and export

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use db
go      
DECLARE @procName varchar(100)      
DECLARE @cursorProcNames CURSOR      
SET @cursorProcNames = CURSOR FOR      
select name from sys.procedures where modify_date > '2009-02-05 13:12:15.273' order by modify_date desc     

OPEN @cursorProcNames      
FETCH NEXT      
FROM @cursorProcNames INTO @procName      
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0      
BEGIN      
-- see the text of the last stored procedures modified on 
-- the db , hint Ctrl + T would give you the procedures test 
set nocount off;      
exec sp_HelpText @procName --- or print them      
-- print @procName      

FETCH NEXT      
FROM @cursorProcNames INTO @procName      
END      
CLOSE @cursorProcNames      

select @@error  
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SQL Server Management Studio keyboard shortcuts... that will enable quicker and faster results in day-to-day works. http://sqlserver-qa.net/blogs/tools/archive/2007/04/25/management-studio-shortcut-keys.aspx

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master..spt_values (and specifically type='p') has been really useful for string splitting and doing 'binning' and time interpolation manipulation.

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You can create a comma separated list with a subquery and not have the last trailing comma. This has been said to be more efficient than the functions that were used before this became available. I think 2005 and later.

SELECT 
    Project.ProjectName,
    (SELECT
        SUBSTRING(
            (SELECT ', ' + Site.SiteName
            FROM Site
            WHERE Site.ProjectKey = Project.ProjectKey
            ORDER BY Project.ProjectName
    FOR XML PATH('')),2,200000)) AS CSV 
FROM Project

You can also use FOR XML PATH with nested queries to select to XML which I have found useful.

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sp_lock: displays all the current locks. The returned data can be further queried as:

spid - use it with sp_who to see who owns the lock.

objid - use it with select object_name(objid) to see which database object is locked.

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I use SSMS to find text in files on the OS harddrive. It makes it super easy to write regex and sift through any directory to replace or find text. I always found this easier then using windows.

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