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I'd greatly appreciate help with that algorithm/pseudo code.

Basically I'm looking for words with a particular pattern (doesn't matter what). I have a special function to determine it, which returns 1 if the word fulfills the requirements. When it does, the second word after that should be omitted and not saved in the output. I had no problem with that, when the "chosen" words are separated by one "not chosen" word. The problem is - what to do when the "chosen" ones appear one after the other ?

I've prepared such a pseudo code to clarify the situation a bit. But unfortunately it doesn't work for all the combinations of "chosen" and "not chosen".

I introduced three counters/variables, helping me to discover the position I'm currently at.

Following pseudo code isn't in logical order!

if (counter == 2 || in_a_row >= 3) {
    erase = 1;
    counter--;
    yes = 0;
    if (!chosen) 
        counter = 0;
}
if (chosen) {
    counter++;
    yes = 1;
    in_a_row++;
} else {
    if (yes = 1) /* yes - is used when the preceeding word is chosen and the next is not chosen, in order to keep track of the counter */
        counter++;
}
if (in_a_row == 5)
    in_a_row = 4; /* just to make sure that counter doesn't go too high */
if (erase == 1)
    /*erasing procedure*/

If You have a simpler idea, or see a mistake in that one, PLEASE help me. Trying to work that out for 8 hours...

share|improve this question
    
I do not fully get all the conditions where a word should be deleted or not. So, this is just a general remark. Assuming that you have the whole list of words before starting the algorithm (i.e., you are not working in real time with keyboard input for instance), my experience with similar problems is that you have to erase from the back to the top of the list. The idea is to (1) put the words on a list, then (2) run through the whole list, (3) flag the elements to be erased, (4) run the list backwards erasing the elements. Erasing backwards makes book-keeping easier. –  rpsml Aug 25 '12 at 20:26
    
@rpsml I can carry on with processing the file without problems, the only problem is how to decide which word to omit. –  Peter Kowalski Aug 25 '12 at 20:38
    
Actually, I did not understand the problem as I thought it was pretty trivial (I am probably missing something). My understanding of the algorithm at zeroth order is: if the trigger word is at position i, just flag position i+2 to be erased. And that is it. This would lead to the case that trigger words at i and i+1 would erase words at i+2 and i+3. Trigger words at i, i+1 and i+2 would erase words at i+2 (which is a trigger word itself), i+3 and i+4. What am I missing here? –  rpsml Aug 25 '12 at 21:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pardon me for not using pseudo-code, instead I used actual code. I'm hoping I now understand the problem well enough that my belief that it doesn't seem very complicated, is accurate.

# include <stdio.h>
# include <ctype.h>
# include <string.h>


# define BUFF_SIZE       1024
# define WORD_DELIM     " "
# define MATCH_PATT     "barf"


int main(  int ac ,  char *av[]  )
{
    __u_char    false = ( 1 == 0 ) ;
    __u_char    true = ( 1 == 1 ) ;

    __u_char    match_1_back = false ;
    __u_char    match_2_back = false ;

    char        line_buff[  BUFF_SIZE  ] ;
    char        *buff_ptr ;
    char        *word_ptr ;


    while (  fgets( line_buff ,  BUFF_SIZE ,  stdin )  )
    {
        puts(  "\nInput line was:  "  ) ;
        puts(  line_buff  )  ;

        puts(  "Output line is:  "  ) ;

        buff_ptr = line_buff ;

        while (  ( word_ptr = strtok( buff_ptr ,  WORD_DELIM )  )  !=  NULL  )
        {
            buff_ptr = NULL ;

            if (  strcmp( word_ptr ,  MATCH_PATT  )  ==  0  )
            {
                // Set these to what they should be for next iteration.
                match_2_back = match_1_back ;
                match_1_back = true ;

                // Don't output matched token.
            }
            else
            {
                // Don't output token if a token matched 2 tokens back.
                if (  ! match_2_back  )
                    printf(  "%s " ,  word_ptr  ) ;

                // Set these to what they should be for next iteration.
                match_2_back = match_1_back ;
                match_1_back = false ;
            }
        }

        printf(  "\n"  ) ;
    }
}

With this input:

barf   barf  barf   healthy     feeling     better   barf  barf barf uh oh sick again
barf   barf  healthy     feeling     better   barf  barf uh oh sick again
barf   healthy     barf   feeling     better     barf   uh   barf   oh sick again
barf   healthy     feeling     better   barf uh oh sick again

I got this output:

Input line was:  
barf   barf  barf   healthy     feeling     better   barf  barf barf uh oh sick again

Output line is:  
better sick again


Input line was:  
barf   barf  healthy     feeling     better   barf  barf uh oh sick again

Output line is:  
better sick again


Input line was:  
barf   healthy     barf   feeling     better     barf   uh   barf   oh sick again

Output line is:  
healthy feeling uh oh again


Input line was:  
barf   healthy     feeling     better   barf uh oh sick again

Output line is:  
healthy better uh sick again

I just used a simple comparison, not actual regular expressions. I only wanted to illustrate the algorithm. Does the output conform to the requirements?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Use of the word "chosen" made it sound as if the word was chosen for output. –  toes_314 Aug 25 '12 at 20:33
    
Although Your implementation slightly differs from the one in the task. I'd like to say I'M SO HAPPY YOU HELPED ME, based on that I created my own program, which now WORKS LIKE CHARM. Best wishes ! –  Peter Kowalski Aug 26 '12 at 15:34

Sounds like a classic use for Regular Expressions. You don't specify a language but many languages support RegEx.

The following site is a good starting point / reference for RegEx if you are not familiar with it. http://www.regular-expressions.info/quickstart.html

You would use an expression made of three parts. Syntax below is from memory so you'll need to double check it:

  • (first) - Matches the word 'first'
  • [\w]*{1,3} - Any word which is repeated for example between 1 and 3 times -
  • (second) - Matches the word 'second'
share|improve this answer
    
Dont know who +1 that but it's just an advert of software. No, thanks I need to use plain C. –  Peter Kowalski Aug 25 '12 at 19:07
    
Hi Peter, Just to clarify it's not an advert for software. Regular Expressions are a built in feature of many programming languages. The site I gave a link to is not one I'm affiliated with but is one that I use as a reference on a regular basis. Anyway I'm pleased you found a solution –  mbliss Aug 27 '12 at 8:27

Something like this?

for (i = 0; i<wordcount; i++)
{
    CurrentWord = Words[i]
    if (WordMatchesCritera(CurrentWord))
    {
        if (HavePrecedingWord)
        { 
             success !!!
        } 
        else
        {
            i ++;
            HavePrecedingWord = true
        }
    }
    else
    {
        HavePrecedingWord = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It completely doesn't work. Imagine sequence: chosen chosen not not. According to Your algorithm first chosen would set Havepreceeding to 1 which would delete chosen2 instead of not1. Thanks anyway –  Peter Kowalski Aug 25 '12 at 19:02
    
@peterkowalski no - the i++ would skip chosen2 –  podiluska Aug 26 '12 at 8:10

Will this work ?

    matchID = -1;
    eraseID = -1;


    for(i = 0; i < ... ; i++)
    {
         if( wordMatches ( word[i] ) )
         {                  
            matchID = i;     /* found the chosen one */
            eraseID = -1;         
         }
         else 
         {
            if( matchID != -1 ) /* chosen one was found ? */
            {
                 eraseID = i;   /* erase the next non-matching one */
                 break; /* ? done for now  ? */
            }

          }
    }
share|improve this answer

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