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This one will require some knowledge of both bash and tcsh. I would like to put a line in a bash script that calls a command with some arguments, but using the tcsh interpreter. Suppose the command I want to call is ls (which is silly, but it demonstrates the problem). So if my_script contains:

#!/bin/bash
/bin/tcsh -c "ls"' "$*"' "${@}"

and then I call it as follows:

my_script "first file" "second file"

I get this:

ls: first file second file: No such file or directory

The problem is that tcsh is receiving only one argument, first file second file, instead of two arguments. How can I remedy this?

share|improve this question
    
does it work when you just specify one file with the ls example? you might need to set your PATH –  Amir Afghani Aug 25 '12 at 18:19
    
Yes, @AmirAfghani, with one argument it receives first file. –  JCOidl Aug 25 '12 at 18:22
    
try using one quote and seperate the two files with a space –  Amir Afghani Aug 25 '12 at 18:24
    
my_script "fileA fileB" –  Amir Afghani Aug 25 '12 at 18:24
    
Your bash stuff is okay; it's the tcsh stuff that's broken. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 25 '12 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

Your tcsh script is wrong. Beware, I don't know tcsh, but this is what I can tell from a few tests.

change it to

#!/bin/bash
/bin/tcsh -c 'ls "$1" "$2"' "$@"

You would need a "$@" instead of your "$*" on the tcsh side just like on the bash side. In bash, "$*" expands to a single word (the concatenation of all positional arguments, separated by the first IFS character (default space)), whereas "$@" expands to one word for each positional argument.

In tcsh, it seems like "$*" does the same, but I found no equivalent of "$@". In this case, you know the number of arguments and can use "$1" "$2" instead. Note that many people have cursed tcsh, so it might be very possible that there simply is no better solution...

So, to correct your assumptions, in your original script, it is not tcsh which receives only a single argument from bash, but it's ls receiving only a single one from tcsh.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a clever short cut that works for this example, but avoids the problem of creating a string that can interpreted by tcsh. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 25 '12 at 20:34
1  
No, it's exactly the same as the one from OP, changing only * to @ (OP did no string-"creating" whatsoever) –  Jo So Aug 25 '12 at 20:37
1  
When I try this, tcsh simply returns "Illegal variable name". As far as I can tell, $@ is not a defined variable in tcsh. –  JCOidl Aug 25 '12 at 21:51
    
+1 I'm embarrassed I did my initial tcsh testing wrong. Edited. –  Jo So Aug 25 '12 at 23:02
    
So, how do you generalize that to the N argument case? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 26 '12 at 14:15

Despite the comments, there's no direct problem with tcsh (and believe me, I'm no fan of C shell), nor is there a problem with bash per se. The problems would be similar, in fact, if you replaced the tcsh with bash.

The problem is that what you're trying to do is actually extremely difficult to do. Let me explain...

In the bash script, you are trying to create a single string that will contain a valid command line that tcsh will interpret correctly, including preserving spaces in arguments.

Developing an answer step-by-step

Let's start with some easy stuff — arguments without spaces in them:

set -- /bin/ls /bin/sh /bin/bash   # Set the arguments to bash
/bin/tcsh -c "ls -l $*"

This will work fine; it will execute the C shell and the C shell will process the string and execute:

ls -l /bin/ls /bin/sh /bin/bash

So, the problem is how to relay arguments with spaces in them to C shell reliably when the command as a whole is being specified as a single string.

You already know that this runs into problems:

mkdir "./a b c" "./d e f"
set -- "a b c" "d e f"          # Two arguments with spaces
/bin/tcsh -c "ls -al $*"

On my machine, I get:

ls: a: No such file or directory
ls: b: No such file or directory
ls: c: No such file or directory
ls: d: No such file or directory
ls: e: No such file or directory
ls: f: No such file or directory

If we do the expansion manually, we can get the desired result (for this limited example) with:

mkdir "./a b c" "./d e f"
set -- "a b c" "d e f"          # Two arguments with spaces
/bin/tcsh -c "ls -al 'a b c' 'd e f'"

This yields:

a b c:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
drwxr-xr-x  4 jleffler  staff  136 Aug 25 12:21 ..

d e f:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
drwxr-xr-x  4 jleffler  staff  136 Aug 25 12:21 ..

(I'm going to assume that the two directories 'a b c' and 'd e f' exist from here onwards without creating them each time.)

So, the objective must be to find a way to create a string that will be safe when interpreted by the C shell, automatically (not manually as shown). Because of the metasyntactic zoo that C shell has (lots of special characters), the full task will be hard, but let's get the easy stuff done first — spaces and no metacharacters.

For each argument, we want to add single quotes to the start and end, and ensure that any single quotes inside the string are protected. That is its own little party; the trick is to replace the embedded single quotes with the sequence '\'' where the first single quote ends the current single-quoted string, the backslash single-quote embeds a single quote, and the final single quote starts a new single-quoted string. And we want that added to the end of the current command string. So, this leads to:

set -- "a b c" "d e f"          # Two arguments with spaces
cmd="ls -al"
for arg in "$@"
do escaped=$(sed -e "s/'/'\\''/g" -e "s/^/'/" -e "s/$/'/" <<< "$arg")
   cmd="$cmd $escaped"
done
echo "$cmd"
tcsh -c "$cmd"

This yields (the ls line is from the echo, of course):

ls -al 'a b c' 'd e f'
a b c:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
drwxr-xr-x  4 jleffler  staff  136 Aug 25 12:21 ..

d e f:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
drwxr-xr-x  4 jleffler  staff  136 Aug 25 12:21 ..

OK, so far, so good. What about the metasyntactic zoo? Fortunately, most of the characters have no special meaning inside single quotes.

Time to add some more complex directories to the list (these will survive for the duration of the question, too). Make sure you know what names are being created; you need to understand shell quoting rather well.

As an exercise, for each directory name created during this question, write alternatives that give the same result when enclosed in single quotes, when enclosed in double quotes, and without any quotes around the whole argument.

$ mkdir '! % *' '$(pwd)' '`pwd`'

And the script is mostly unchanged — it uses the shell glob to generate the list of directory names, echoes each argument in turn, and lists the inode numbers too:

set -- *
cmd="ls -ail"
for arg in "$@"
do echo "arg: $arg"
   escaped=$(sed -e "s/'/'\\''/g" -e "s/^/'/" -e "s/$/'/" <<< "$arg")
   cmd="$cmd $escaped"
done
echo "cmd: $cmd"
tcsh -c "$cmd"

Hey presto:

arg: ! % *
arg: $(pwd)
arg: `pwd`
arg: a b c
arg: d e f
cmd: ls -ail '! % *' '$(pwd)' '`pwd`' 'a b c' 'd e f'
! % *:
total 0
1640119 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  7 jleffler  staff  238 Aug 25 12:34 ..

$(pwd):
total 0
1640120 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  7 jleffler  staff  238 Aug 25 12:34 ..

`pwd`:
total 0
1640121 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  7 jleffler  staff  238 Aug 25 12:34 ..

a b c:
total 0
1640056 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  7 jleffler  staff  238 Aug 25 12:34 ..

d e f:
total 0
1640057 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  7 jleffler  staff  238 Aug 25 12:34 ..

Just what the doctor ordered! But we haven't yet been brutal enough: like Knuth says, you have to get into a really nasty mean mindset when you're testing code, so let's try:

$ mkdir "O'Reilly's Books"
$ mkdir "' \` \""
$ mkdir '${HOME}' '$PATH' 'He said, "Don'\''t Do It!"'
$ ls -l
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:34 ! % *
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:34 $(pwd)
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:45 $PATH
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:45 ${HOME}
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:43 ' ` "
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:45 He said, "Don't Do It!"
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:43 O'Reilly's Books
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:34 `pwd`
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:21 a b c
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:21 d e f
$ 

And the result is:

arg: ! % *
arg: $(pwd)
arg: $PATH
arg: ${HOME}
arg: ' ` "
arg: He said, "Don't Do It!"
arg: O'Reilly's Books
arg: `pwd`
arg: a b c
arg: d e f
cmd: ls -ail '! % *' '$(pwd)' '$PATH' '${HOME}' '''' ` "' 'He said, "Don'''t Do It!"' 'O'''Reilly'''s Books' '`pwd`' 'a b c' 'd e f'
Unmatched `.

That's not what we wanted. Part of the trouble, though, is that sequence of 4 single quotes in the line tagged 'cmd:'; it should be ''\''. So, the sed script isn't accurate enough.

set -- *
cmd="ls -ail"
for arg in "$@"
do echo "arg: $arg"
   escaped=$(sed -e "s/'/'\\\\''/g" -e "s/^/'/" -e "s/$/'/" <<< "$arg")
   cmd="$cmd $escaped"
done
echo "cmd: $cmd"
tcsh -c "$cmd"

And when it is run, we get:

arg: ! % *
arg: $(pwd)
arg: $PATH
arg: ${HOME}
arg: ' ` "
arg: He said, "Don't Do It!"
arg: O'Reilly's Books
arg: `pwd`
arg: a b c
arg: d e f
arg: x.sh
cmd: ls -ail '! % *' '$(pwd)' '$PATH' '${HOME}' ''\'' ` "' 'He said, "Don'\''t Do It!"' 'O'\''Reilly'\''s Books' '`pwd`' 'a b c' 'd e f' 'x.sh'
1640231 -rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  223 Aug 25 12:56 x.sh

! % *:
total 0
1640119 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

$(pwd):
total 0
1640120 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

$PATH:
total 0
1640176 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

${HOME}:
total 0
1640175 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

' ` ":
total 0
1640163 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

He said, "Don't Do It!":
total 0
1640177 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

O'Reilly's Books:
total 0
1640164 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

`pwd`:
total 0
1640121 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

a b c:
total 0
1640056 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

d e f:
total 0
1640057 drwxr-xr-x   2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 .
1640040 drwxr-xr-x  13 jleffler  staff  442 Aug 25 12:56 ..

Mean enough? Getting close. What about directory names containing backslashes?

$ mkdir "a \\' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c"      # Make sure you do the exercise!
$ mkdir 'a \\'\'' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c'   # Make sure you do the exercise!
$ ls -li
total 8
1640119 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 ! % *
1640120 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 $(pwd)
1640176 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 $PATH
1640175 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 ${HOME}
1640163 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 ' ` "
1640177 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 He said, "Don't Do It!"
1640164 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 O'Reilly's Books
1640121 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 `pwd`
1640243 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:58 a \' \` \$ b \" c
1640259 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:01 a \\' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c
1640056 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 a b c
1640057 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 d e f
1640231 -rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  223 Aug 25 12:56 x.sh
$ 

And with the ls -ail changed to ls -dil, the output is:

$ bash x.sh
arg: ! % *
arg: $(pwd)
arg: $PATH
arg: ${HOME}
arg: ' ` "
arg: He said, "Don't Do It!"
arg: O'Reilly's Books
arg: `pwd`
arg: a \' \` \$ b \" c
arg: a \\' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c
arg: a b c
arg: d e f
arg: x.sh
cmd: ls -dil '! % *' '$(pwd)' '$PATH' '${HOME}' ''\'' ` "' 'He said, "Don'\''t Do It!"' 'O'\''Reilly'\''s Books' '`pwd`' 'a \'\'' \` \$ b \" c' 'a \\'\'' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c' 'a b c' 'd e f' 'x.sh'
1640119 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 ! % *
1640120 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 $(pwd)
1640176 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 $PATH
1640175 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 ${HOME}
1640163 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 ' ` "
1640177 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 He said, "Don't Do It!"
1640164 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 O'Reilly's Books
1640121 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 `pwd`
1640243 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:58 a \' \` \$ b \" c
1640259 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:01 a \\' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c
1640056 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 a b c
1640057 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 d e f
1640271 -rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  223 Aug 25 13:03 x.sh
$ 

Working Script

set -- *
cmd="ls -ail"
for arg in "$@"
do echo "arg: $arg"
   escaped=$(sed -e "s/'/'\\\\''/g" -e "s/^/'/" -e "s/$/'/" <<< "$arg")
   cmd="$cmd $escaped"
done
echo "cmd: $cmd"
tcsh -c "$cmd"

Summary

The key parts to the solution are:

  1. Recognizing that single quotes are needed around the arguments.
  2. Knowing how to escape single quotes.
  3. Knowing how to escape backslashes.
  4. Being really brutal when you do your testing!
  5. It helps if you've done it before...

Oh futz! I forgot to test arguments containing newlines:

$ mkdir "a
> b
> c"
$ ls -li
total 8
1640119 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 ! % *
1640120 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 $(pwd)
1640176 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 $PATH
1640175 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 ${HOME}
1640163 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 ' ` "
1640177 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:45 He said, "Don't Do It!"
1640164 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:43 O'Reilly's Books
1640121 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:34 `pwd`
1640336 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:16 a?b?c
1640243 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:58 a \' \` \$ b \" c
1640259 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:01 a \\' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c
1640056 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 a b c
1640057 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 12:21 d e f
1640271 -rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  223 Aug 25 13:03 x.sh
$

Well, there are some reasons why you should never try to parse the output from ls; it has generated question marks in place of the newlines (this is on Mac OS X 10.8.1 and is not GNU ls, just for those keeping score at home; other systems may behave differently).

And when the script (x.sh) is run, I get:

$ bash x.sh
arg: ! % *
arg: $(pwd)
arg: $PATH
arg: ${HOME}
arg: ' ` "
arg: He said, "Don't Do It!"
arg: O'Reilly's Books
arg: `pwd`
arg: a
b
c
arg: a \' \` \$ b \" c
arg: a \\' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c
arg: a b c
arg: d e f
arg: x.sh
cmd: ls -dil '! % *' '$(pwd)' '$PATH' '${HOME}' ''\'' ` "' 'He said, "Don'\''t Do It!"' 'O'\''Reilly'\''s Books' '`pwd`' 'a'
'b'
'c' 'a \'\'' \` \$ b \" c' 'a \\'\'' \\\` \\$ b \\\" c' 'a b c' 'd e f' 'x.sh'
ls: a: No such file or directory
1640119 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:34 ! % *
1640120 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:34 $(pwd)
1640176 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:45 $PATH
1640175 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:45 ${HOME}
1640163 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:43 ' ` "
1640177 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:45 He said, "Don't Do It!"
1640164 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:43 O'Reilly's Books
1640121 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 25 12:34 `pwd`
b: Command not found.
c: Command not found.
$

There are multiple issues here. The sed script treated each line of the argument separately. That really isn't soluble using sed; or, perhaps more accurately, it isn't something I want to solve using sed. Æons ago, I wrote a C program escape to do the job that the sed script almost does.

#!/bin/bash

set -- *
escaped=$(escape "$@")
cmd="ls -dil $escaped"
echo "cmd: $cmd"
bash -c "$cmd"
tcsh -c "$cmd"

Note that I've added an invocation of bash in there. The output is:

cmd: ls -dil '! % *' '$(pwd)' '$PATH' '${HOME}' ''\'' ` "' 'He said, "Don'\''t Do It!"' 'O'\''Reilly'\''s Books' '`pwd`' 'a
b
c' 'a b c' 'd e f' x.sh
178474064 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 ! % *
178474065 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 $(pwd)
178474219 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 $PATH
178474218 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 ${HOME}
178474170 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 ' ` "
178474220 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 He said, "Don't Do It!"
178474131 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 O'Reilly's Books
178474066 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 `pwd`
178474998 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:40 a?b?c
178473958 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 a b c
178473959 drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff   68 Aug 25 13:38 d e f
178475097 -rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  115 Aug 25 13:41 x.sh
Unmatched '.
b: Command not found.
Unmatched '.

Wassup? Well, bash and other shells derived from the Bourne shell such as ksh, are OK with a string starting on one line and continuing over other lines, but the C shell and its derivatives are not. They demand a backslash before the newline. So, to work with tcsh, I'd have to upgrade escape to generate the output for the C shell. Not at all hard to do, but it would need doing. Presumably, that would be an option -c and for general purpose safety, the invocation would become:

escaped=$(escape -c -- "$@")

with the double-dash preventing misinterpretation of arguments in "$@" as options to escape itself. In part, this goes to show that it is hard to write scripts that deal with file names that contain characters outside the portable file name character set. Fortunately, I don't have to deal with the C shell very often; I don't plan to make that a part of escape because it is a change of interface (the current code does not have any options of its own, so I do not use the double-dash notation with escape). If I need it, it will become cescape to unconditionally support the C shell.

share|improve this answer
1  
Someone should damn well explain their down-vote! –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 25 '12 at 20:23
    
Who has time to read that? –  Jo So Aug 25 '12 at 20:23
    
@JoSo: It is a complicated topic; it takes time to explain. People who need to know will learn by studying it. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 25 '12 at 20:26
    
Sorry, but the question was simple and has a simple answer. Nobody has asked to explain shell in-depth, there are better references for this, and playing around is what everybody should do on his own. –  Jo So Aug 25 '12 at 20:28
    
A+ for a comprehensive tutorial, @JonathanLeffler! I'll have to work my way through it. I really appreciate the time you took. –  JCOidl Aug 25 '12 at 21:53

To answer my own question... this is the solution:

/bin/tcsh -c "ls "'$argv:q' "${@}"
share|improve this answer

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