Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently installed MinGW and MSYS on my Windows 32 machine and it seems to be running fine.

On the C++ compiler, I am including a vector container and getting no errors to that. But I`m getting compile-time errors when I try to use it.

So, the code

#include <vector>  // include vector.h  
#include <stdio.h>  // include stdio.h

using namespace std;

main()  {

//   vector<int> A;  

printf("\nHeya ..");

}

is running just fine. However, the moment I un-comment line 8-- the vector declaration line, I get the following error (shortened) in compile time:

undefined reference to 'operator delete(void*)'
undefined reference to '__gxx_personality_v0'
share|improve this question
    
You're not, by chance, compiling with gcc instead of g++, are you? –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 25 '12 at 18:28
    
try gcc -std=c++0x program.cpp –  perilbrain Aug 25 '12 at 18:32

2 Answers 2

You're probably compiling with gcc instead of g++. The actual compiler is the same, but g++ tells the linker to use the default C++ libraries, were gcc only tells it to look at the C libraries. As soon as you use and C++-specific parts of the standard library, gcc will fail.

As an aside, C++ doesn't support the default int rule from old C, so you should really specify the return type from main.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, g++ works! swimming new in these waters-- minGW –  ashley Aug 25 '12 at 19:15

I don't see how you are compiling your code. Your main method is invalid, incorrect signature and you aren't returning anything.

Should be like this:

#include <vector>  // include vector.h  
#include <stdio.h>  // include stdio.h

using namespace std;

int main(int, char**)  {

//   vector<int> A;  

printf("\nHeya ..");
return 0;
}

Also you need to compile this with g++ and not gcc.

share|improve this answer
    
And yours too... –  perilbrain Aug 25 '12 at 18:30
    
@Anonymous How is it wrong? –  anio Aug 25 '12 at 18:31
    
The only thing that needs to be fixed for main is to add the int return type. The arguments and the actual return statement are not necessary, though not wrong either. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 25 '12 at 18:32
    
int main(int argc,int char* argv[]) you are declaring! not defining... –  perilbrain Aug 25 '12 at 18:33
    
@Anonymous If I define those variables, the compiler will give me a warning about those variables being unused. Also, why define something that isn't going to be used? I only define argc & argv if I actually use them in main. –  anio Aug 25 '12 at 18:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.