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What is the difference between release mode and debug mode?

And how can I debug in release mode to see whats failing?

class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        try
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new MainWindow());
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Logger.Error("Main : "+ex.Message, typeof(Program));
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message + ex.StackTrace);
            Environment.Exit(1);
        }
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The catch clause in your snippet will never catch anything in the shipping version of your app. It does work when you run it with a debugger attached.

What you are missing is the way Application.ThreadException behaves. That event fires whenever any unhandled exception is detected. This feature however is not enabled when you debug your code. No exception handler is installed to raise the event. This was done so you have a decent way to debug unhandled exceptions. Your code changes that behavior, now there is a try block active, your catch handler gets the exception.

To get the code to behave the same way, you'll need to change the unhandled exception handling strategy. Like this:

    [STAThread]
    static void Main() {
        try {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.ThrowException);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            // etc..
        }
    }

Now your catch clause will always catch the exception. As long as it is raised on the main thread, it won't catch exceptions raised in worker threads. Consider this code instead for unified handling:

    [STAThread]
    static void Main() {
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += AllUnhandledExceptions;
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
        Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.ThrowException);
        Application.Run(new Form1());
    }

    private static void AllUnhandledExceptions(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e) {
        var ex = (Exception)e.ExceptionObject;
        // Display or log ex.ToString()
        //...
        Environment.Exit(System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetHRForException(ex));
    }
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thanks for your great advice –  armin Aug 25 '12 at 19:35
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My experience tells me that you should be looking for code where you handle settings of any kind.

You could start out by debug you application with no settings in registry and no settings in application.config.

If your application uses a database you should try it with an empty database as well.

Second step would be to debug your application on a computer of you collegue.

Hope this will help your quest.

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The best way to find any environmental option is to log what is going on in production. Start by catching and logging exceptions, then use what you learn for more specific logging.

See this Microsoft kb article for instructions.

As to the ideas behind Release and Debug modes:

Release mode and Debug mode exist to allow different configurations, one design to help the developer find bugs, the other to optimize performance, and to configure for the production environment.

The best way to learn the difference is simply bring up your project Build properties (right click on your project, select Properties, then click the Build tab on the Left). Look at all the different options that can change based on the Configuration.

Another common problem with debug vs. release is not setting the correct Build Action on one of your project items, such as a config file or embedded resource.

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Debug and release modes are two different ways to build your code. Since the specific ways differs for almost every development environment you use it's impossible to tell right away. The modes could as well be called Mode1 & Mode2.

However, your debug mode probably compiles debug information (symbol tables, line numbering, etc.) into your binary where release doesn't. But there can be thousands differences.

Try to find where Debug/Release modes are specified and you will find the differences!

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There are many reasons why it could happen, and many professionals could confirm that that is a classic bug of any application, that appears when you're sure everything wrks fine, but on client machine doesn't work anything.

It's very difficult to say why this happen without any exception detail provided in the question.

By the way you can debug your application by attaching to it from Visual Studio.

How to: Attach to a Running Process

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Thanks for your answer but can you explain why my code above doesn't even catch this exception?it just crashes,not exceptions,no messageboxes or anything –  armin Aug 25 '12 at 18:41
    
@armin what does EventViewer say? –  L.B Aug 25 '12 at 18:46
1  
Well, there are types of exceptions that can not be caugth by try/catch, like StackOverflow for example. Look on EventViewer, like L.B suggests, or Enable First Chance Exceptions to see where and what happens. –  Tigran Aug 25 '12 at 18:49
    
@L.B Application: Mindry.exe Framework Version: v4.0.30319 Description: The process was terminated due to an unhandled exception. Exception Info: System.BadImageFormatException –  armin Aug 25 '12 at 19:12
    
@armin: do you run in release mode on another machine or on the same machine where you develop? –  Tigran Aug 25 '12 at 19:18
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