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Imagine that you have a list called List<Foo>.

Foo is an abstract class, so this can be FooA, FooB, FooC or FooD. And I'd like to have an extension for List<T> where you can order this elements by type but sequently.

For example, if I have 9 elements in it.

FooA, FooA, FooB, FooD, FooC, FooC, FooA, FooB, FooA

Order by type sequently will be.

FooA, FooB, FooC, FooD, FooA, FooB, FooC, FooA, FooA

I'm trying that the function can be ordered at the order you specify, at this case, IE, it was:

new[] { typeof(FooA), typeof(FooB), typeof(FooC), typeof(FooD) }

I was trying to create this extension, but I don't get anything. Can you help a little bit? I'm guessing that I can accomplish it with LINQ.

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what happens if there is no FooC in the list or there is FooA, FooB, FooC, FooC, FooC, FooD, how do you sort that? i would recommend you adapting selection sort for your purposes. –  DarthVader Aug 25 '12 at 20:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can group the items by type, sort the groups by type and interleave the groups:

var groups = items.GroupBy(x => x.GetType())
                  .OrderBy(g => orderedTypes.IndexOf(g.Key))
                  .ToList();

var result = groups.First().Interleave(groups.Skip(1).ToArray());

using the Interleave method from EvenMoreLINQ.

foreach (var item in result)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item.GetType());
}

Output:

FooA
FooB
FooC
FooD
FooA
FooB
FooC
FooA
FooA
share|improve this answer

Group on the type, then loop through the items to add one set each time. Something like:

var groups =
  collection.GroupBy(x => x.GetType())
  .ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.ToList());

List<Foo> result = new List<Foo>();
int max = groups.Values.Max(n => n.Count);
for (int i = 0; i < max; i++) {
  foreach (Type  t in sortArray) {
    if (groups[t].Count > i) {
      result.Add(groups[t][i]);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is sortArray ? –  L.B Aug 25 '12 at 22:01
    
@L.B: The array of Type objects that specifies the sort order. –  Guffa Aug 25 '12 at 23:20

list is a collection of elements to be sorted.
pattern is a collection of elements in specific order.
result is a collection of elements from list ordered according to the pattern.

var list = new List<Foo> { new FooA(), new FooB(), new FooC(), new FooA(), new FooC(), new FooA(), new FooD() };
var pattern = new Foo[] { new FooB(), new FooC(), new FooD(), new FooA() };

var result = list.OrderBy(p => p, new MyFooComparer(pattern));

There is a class MyFooComparer that implements interface IComparer<>.
Comparison is based on the position of each Foo in pattern collection. pattern elements must not be duplicated and they must contain all types of Foo (at least those used in list).
I used Dictionary<> to store the pattern order because it has O(1) complexity.

public class MyFooComparer : IComparer<Foo>
{
    private readonly Dictionary<Type, int> _pattern;
    public MyFooComparer(IEnumerable<Foo> pattern)
    {
        _pattern = new Dictionary<Type, int>();
        int i = 0;
        foreach (var foo in pattern)
        {
            _pattern.Add(foo.GetType(), i);
            i++;
        }
    }

    public int Compare(Foo x, Foo y)
    {
        var xVal = _pattern[x.GetType()];
        var yVal = _pattern[y.GetType()];
        return xVal.CompareTo(yVal);
    }
}

After calling:

        foreach (var foo in result)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(foo.GetType().Name);
        }

According to the pattern, you will get:

FooB
FooC
FooC
FooD
FooA
FooA
FooA

EDIT:

Extension for List<Foo>:

static class MyExtension
{
    public static IEnumerable<Foo> OrderByFoo<T>(this List<Foo> list, IEnumerable<Foo> patern)
    {
        return list.OrderBy(p => p, new MyFooComparer(patern));
    }
}
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