Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to programatically call the "top" command. The following is the code used:

char buffer [128];
char* threadsPointer;
char* procPointer;
NSString* numberOfThreadsString;
NSString* numberOfProcString;
FILE* output = popen("/usr/bin/top", "r");

while (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), output) != NULL)
{
    if ((procPointer = strstr(buffer, "Processes:")) != NULL)
    {
        procPointer += strlen("Proceses: ");
        strcpy(buffer, procPointer);
        numberOfProcString =  [NSString stringWithUTF8String: buffer];
    }

    if ((threadsPointer = strstr(buffer, "sleeping,")) != NULL)
    {
        threadsPointer += strlen("sleeping, ");
        strcpy(buffer, threadsPointer);
        numberOfThreadsString =  [NSString stringWithUTF8String: buffer];
    }
}

NSLog(@"Proc: %@\nThreads: %@\n\n\n", numberOfProcString, numberOfThreadsString);

Instead of giving valid output, I keep getting the error: "Error opening terminal: unknown". I commended out the whole piece of code to identify the problem, and realized that its the line: FILE* output = popen ("/usr/bin/top", "r"); that is causing the error.

Does anyone have an idea of what I am doing wrong? Note I am on Mountain Lion OS X building an app for OSX not iOS.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can try "top -l 1".

"-l 1" mean 1 sample, I think it should run top in non-interactive mode, print the result and exit.

On linux the command is "top -n 1" ("-n 1" mean run only 1 iteration, which should be equivalent to "top -l 1" on mac osx).

share|improve this answer
add comment

top on MacOSX requires that its standard output or standard error be connected to a valid terminal to run. When you invoke it without a terminal (or a $TERM environment variable set to a valid terminal name, like "vt100"), it gives you that error: Error opening terminal: unknown.

You really shouldn't be using top for this, since it's an interactive program that requires a terminal. You should just be using ps.

share|improve this answer
    
ps doesn't provide the information I need- the total number of running threads and processes. top is my only option. How would I connect the standard output to a valid terminal? –  fdh Aug 25 '12 at 21:33
add comment

If you want specific information or all the details you should use "/proc" filesystem.

You can readdir() and fopen() all the files in /proc which contains currently running processes and get a lot of information, like for example what files are open by some process, or what ports is the process listening on.

'top' command opens a terminal and waits for user input. You won't be able to use it in a an automated script

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.