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If I know the value of $c_xp, how can I find $c_level without writing 100's of if statements.

Level     XP
1         0-99
2         100
3         500  +400 xp points from last level
4         1000 +500 xp points from last level
5         1600 +600 xp points from last level
6         2300 +700 xp points from last level
7         3100 +800 xp points from last level
8         4000 +900 xp points from last level

And so on.

$c_level = ;
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It looks like the increase increases by 100 per level, so you could perhaps make a calculation to find that other than the first. –  Jared Farrish Aug 25 '12 at 22:37
    
are level and XP stored in array? –  Hawili Aug 25 '12 at 22:37
2  
@JaredFarrish It definitely doesn't increase 100/level... OP: We'd need a bit more information. Where is this stored? –  Jeremy Aug 25 '12 at 22:39
2  
@alfasin No! Worst advice you could give right now... –  Jeremy Aug 25 '12 at 22:39
1  
@JaredFarrish Ahh, okay I see... –  Jeremy Aug 25 '12 at 22:44
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If I understand your pattern correctly:

$c_level = floor((-1 + sqrt(1 + 4 * ($c_xp + 500) / 100 * 2)) / 2) - 1;

You are adding 100, then 400, then 500, 600, 700, 800, and so on. Because 100 kind of breaks the pattern, we are going to ignore it for now.

Assuming you were going after the pattern

Level     XP

1         0-99
2         100-299
3         300-599
4         600-999
5         1000-1499
6         1500-2099

This would be easier, because the increments are 100, 200, 300, and so on. Anything under 100 would be level 1. Anything under 300 would be level 2. Anything under 600 would be level 3. Conveniently:

0+1=1 (hence 100)
0+1+2=3 (hence 300)
0+1+2+3=6 (hence 600)

and so on and so fourth. The sum of the first x integers is 0.5 * x * (1 + x) = y, where y is the sum - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summation.

In our case, we have 100 times the sum. We can simply divide our XP by 100 to get y, and use the quadratic formula to solve for x. In the case if XP is 600, the level is 4.

600 / 100 = 6, and 0.5 * x * (1 + x) = 6. The quadratic formula tells us x is 3. We have to use floor() on it and add 1 for reasons I cannot explain. Long story short to adjust with the lack of patter under 500 points, we add 500 and subject 2 to the final amount for the formula to work.

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I have updated the question to show more details about the pattern. Your answer is close to what I am looking for, just a formula that will work to create the pattern. Can you adjust it so it applies only to level 3+ then I can use IF statements for levels 1-2. –  user1625155 Aug 25 '12 at 22:54
    
you don't need any if statement for levels 3+. This formula works for all levels, including 1 and 2. –  Tech163 Aug 25 '12 at 22:57
3  
Holy cow, a formula?!?! –  Jared Farrish Aug 25 '12 at 22:58
    
Thank you very much. –  user1625155 Aug 25 '12 at 23:02
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  1. Store level-xp pairs in array:

    $levels = array(
        1 => 99,
        2 => 499,
        3 => 999
    );
    

    Note that the value associated with level is the maximum value for given level, i.e. one more point would be associated with next level.

  2. Loop through levels array, and check whether player's XP is less than level max value:

    $level = null;
    $xp = 845;
    
    foreach ($levels as $l => $max) {
        if ($xp <= $max) {
            $level = $l;
            break;
        }
    }
    
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1  
Please note that the array needs to be in ascending order. –  aib Aug 25 '12 at 22:41
    
You don't really need to psuedo-key it, just list array(99, 499, 999, etc.). –  Jared Farrish Aug 25 '12 at 22:42
    
@JaredFarrish: Yeah, you could write it like that. Just remember that arrays are 0-based, so the final level would be index + 1. –  Crozin Aug 25 '12 at 22:43
    
I guess I didn't remember forgetting. –  Jared Farrish Aug 25 '12 at 22:44
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Try this:

<?php
    $levels=Array(
    1=>99,
    2=>100,
    3=>500,
    4=>1000,
    5=>1600,
    6=>2300,
    7=>3100,
    8=>4000
    );

    //this will probably be pulled from somewhere else,
    //take it out:
    $c_xp=499;
    foreach($levels as $level=>$xp) {
        if($c_xp>=$xp) $c_level=$level;
        else break;
    }
    echo $c_level;

?>
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1  
Again, the array needs to be in ascending order. –  aib Aug 25 '12 at 22:44
    
Oh, right. The array does need to be in ascending order, so make sure the array is defined correctly. You could always asort() the $levels array if there's any doubt. –  Sean Johnson Aug 25 '12 at 22:45
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Try this

$maxLevel = 10;
$exp[2] = 100;

if($c_xp < 100)
    $c_level = 1;
elseif($c_xp < 500)
    $c_level = 2;

else
{   
   $increment = 400;

   for($i = 3; $i<= $maxLevel; $i++)
    {

        $prevExp = $exp[$i-1];
        $calc = $increment + $prevExp;
        if($c_xp == $calc)
        {
            $c_level = $i;
            break;
        }
        elseif($c_xp > $prevExp && $c_xp < $calc)
        {
            $c_level = $i-1;
            break;
        }
        $exp[$i] = $calc;
        $increment += 100;
    }
}

$c_level = isset($c_level) ? $c_level : $maxLevel;
echo "level $c_level";

Switch the maxLevel var to what you want max level to be.

Probably a more efficient solution, but I suck with algorithms , and it is the weekend.

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