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While reviewing code, I have come across a few if staments using ! followed by an != in the assessment e.g.

if (!(fs.ReadByte() != (byte)'D' ||
      fs.ReadByte() != (byte)'I' ||
      fs.ReadByte() != (byte)'C' ||
      fs.ReadByte() != (byte)'M'))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Not a DCM");
    return;
}

Is there any reason to use a double negative over assessing positive e.g.

if ((fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'D' ||
     fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'I' ||
     fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'C' ||
     fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'M'))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Not a DCM");
    return;
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
not really... maybe just for obfuscation purpose... –  MimiEAM Aug 25 '12 at 23:08
1  
are you sure there is a ! there? looks like a bug. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 25 '12 at 23:11
    
@Karoly Horvath I think you might be right. –  Nate Aug 25 '12 at 23:16
    
Nate: is a DCM file (or stream or whatever) supposed to start with DICM? Because this will write "Not a DCM" if it does start with DICM. –  David Robinson Aug 25 '12 at 23:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Those two are different. The first says "None of these are not equal", the second says "any of these are equal".

If you applied the ! operator across them, you'd have to change the || to an &&:

if ((fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'D' &&
     fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'I' &&
     fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'C' &&
     fs.ReadByte() == (byte)'M'))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Not a DCM");
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well spotted. Then would there be any other reason if the || was replaced by &&? –  Nate Aug 25 '12 at 23:12
    
@Nate: This code doesn't work so fix it the other way... –  Karoly Horvath Aug 25 '12 at 23:14
    
@Nate: What is the code trying to do? We think it might be backwards. –  David Robinson Aug 25 '12 at 23:16
    
@David Robinson It's an answered question related to something I'm working on stackoverflow.com/a/2384533/925922. –  Nate Aug 25 '12 at 23:19
1  
This is called De Morgan's Law - you can move the ! inside the parts of the expression if you switch || with &&. (Obviously in this case it then cancels out with the != resulting in ==.) –  Neil Aug 25 '12 at 23:36

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