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Consider the following scenario:

  • An object myObj is instantiated locally in some function myFunc.
  • myObj starts a thread someThread which runs some background task, e.g. reads from a socket.
  • myFunc then returns, causing myObj to be dereferenced.

Under normal circumstances, the JVM would just garbage-collect myObj. However, if someThread is still running, would this still be the case?

I understand that someThread itself would not be GC'd as long as it is still running, but in my code it also needs to access values stored in myObj, so it is important that I make sure myObj persists while it is still running.

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1  
The Java Virtual Machine specification does not guarantee anything is garbage-collected. What particular JVM are you using? –  oldrinb Aug 26 '12 at 1:07
    
@veer I'm intending to run the finished code on an Oracle JVM on Linux. I guess it would be more appropriate to ask whether myObj is still liable to being garbage-collected while the thread is running. In this case I need to ensure that something does not get GC'd rather than the other way round. –  Saran Aug 26 '12 at 1:12
2  
@Positronized If your thread somehow has access to an object, it must have a reference to it. And if you have a reference to an object, it cannot be garbage collected. –  nos Aug 26 '12 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An object is only eligible for garbage collection if it has no references to it. You say that someThread needs to access values stored in myObj, which means it must have a reference to myObj. This means that myObj is not eligible for garbage collection unless someThread is also eligible.

You can guarantee that an object will never be garbage collected from underneath you so this, for example, is perfectly safe:

void foo() {
    final Object something = new String("I'm alive!");
    new Thread() {
        public void run() {
            try {Thread.sleep(10000);} catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            System.out.println(something);
        }
    }.start();
}

something is referenced by the anonymous thread so it is not eligible for garbage collection until the anonymous thread is done.

More specifically for your example, this is also safe:

void foo() {
    new ThreadStartingObject("I'm alive!");
}

class ThreadStartingObject {
    private String message;

    public void ThreadStartingObject(String msg) {
        this.message = msg;
        new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                try {Thread.sleep(10000);} catch (InterruptedException e) {}
                System.out.println(message);
            }
        }.start();
    }
}

The anonymous inner class representing the thread has an implicit reference to the outer this, i.e. the instance of ThreadStartingObject. That reference prevents garbage collection.

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If I started the thread in myObj's constructor using (new Thread(new Runnable() { ... })).start(), such that the only reference to myObj is via this, does it still count? –  Saran Aug 26 '12 at 1:27
    
Yup. Any reference will prevent garbage collection. –  Cameron Skinner Aug 26 '12 at 2:00

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