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I am trying to create a quiz within a website page. The aim is that every time you press next, a new question will open up within the page. However, calling upon the script a second time doesn't work.

To achieve this, I first created a link called 'next'.

<a href="addquiz.html" name="next" id="1">Next</a>

This calls upon a script which opens q1 from addquiz.html

<script>
$("#1").click(function() {
$("#load").load("addquiz.html" + ' #q1');
event.preventDefault();
});
</script>

In this script there is a submit button which calls upon the function goupone, which increases the id of the link by 1 (eg; from 1 to 2)

<div id="q1">
<h3>5 + 19 = ?</h3>
    <input type="text" width="6" name="" id="question-1-answers" value="" />
    <input type="submit" value="Check" onClick="goupone();" />
</div>

<script>
function goupone(){
var v=document.links[9].id;
vi=parseInt(v);
vi=vi+1;
document.links[9].id=vi;
}
</script>

However, when I click the next button again, nothing happens. Can anyone help?

share|improve this question
    
Just wondering: why do you write load("addquiz.html" + ' #q1');? Isn't that the same as load("addquiz.html #q1");? What's the point of using concatenation when both parameters are literal strings? Also, is that space before the hash allowed in the URL? My guess is that most browsers will ignore it, but it's not something I would depend on, and there seems to be no need to. –  Barmar Aug 26 '12 at 2:48

1 Answer 1

Since you change the id from 1 to 2, the initial click handler $("#1").click() will no longer be triggered when you click on the anchor. An alternative is to either bind the event handler to an a whose attribute name is next:

<script>
$('a[name="next"]').click(function() {
  $("#load").load("addquiz.html" + ' #q1');
  event.preventDefault();
});
</script>

Or create a class, say next, add it to a, and use it as selector:

<a href="addquiz.html" name="next" id="1" class="next">Next</a>

<script>
$('a.next').click(function() {
  $("#load").load("addquiz.html" + ' #q1');
  event.preventDefault();
});
</script>

However, I'd refactor your entire code to simply use the following instead:

<a href="addquiz.html" name="next" id="nextAnchor" data-next-id="1">Next</a>

<script>
$("#nextAnchor").on('click', function() {
  $("#load").load("addquiz.html#q" + $(this).data("next-id"));
  event.preventDefault();
});
</script>

function goupone() {
  var $next = $("#nextAnchor");
  var currentId = parseInt($next.data("next-id"));
  var nextId = currentId + 1;
  $next.data("next-id", nextId);
}

Here's a working DEMO.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think that a class would be more appropriate than a name here. –  Waleed Khan Aug 26 '12 at 2:40
    
I repeat the script 10 times with I'd going from #1 to #10 and q1 going to q10 –  user1325305 Aug 26 '12 at 2:46
1  
Don't forget that id="1" is not valid. IDs have to start with a letter. –  Barmar Aug 26 '12 at 2:49
    
Would the class account for having multiple questions? (I.e. the same link loading q2 and q3 after q1 and q2 have each been loaded respectively) –  user1325305 Aug 26 '12 at 2:50
    
Yes, that's the point of using classes. You can bind something to the entire class, and all instances of it automatically pick this up. –  Barmar Aug 26 '12 at 2:50

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