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New to rails, so if this is discussed somewhere, just link me off: I had a good search but all I could find were people trying to figure out how to use link_to, not any discussion of this comment:

link_to "Profile", profile_path(@profile)
# => <a href="/profiles/1">Profile</a>

in place of the older more verbose, non-resource-oriented

link_to "Profile", :controller => "profiles", :action => "show", :id => @profile
# => <a href="/profiles/show/1">Profile</a>

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionView/Helpers/UrlHelper.html#method-i-link_to

I get that the latter is more verbose, and thus undesirable, but the former seems like a strange thing to be recommending.

If I have an action at say: /blah/add and I link to it using:

link_to "Link", link_add_path

Then I'm linking to mysite.com/link/add. This is a hard coded url.

If I change the route that this maps to, I have to change every instance of link_to in my code base to point to the new absolute url. This seems crazy.

However, if I link to it using:

link_to "Link", :controller => "thing", :action => "add"

Then the url is dynamically determined. If I have to change the path all I do is edit config/routes.rb and not touch any of my code. This seems like much lower maintenance.

I appreciate it's slightly more complex than that, the blah_path variable is not actually a static route, and actually contains some smarts like the application base url and prevents you from linking to urls that don't exist, but it seems like a step backwards to facilitate a fractionally less verbose syntax.

So, what's up with that?

What technical reason would you choose the former link_to syntax over the latter?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"You're doing it wrong" :P

Seriously though: use named resources, and here's why that's cool:

Example: you've got this in your routes file:

    resources :user_orders

And you are using "user_orders_path" everywhere. Then you do a refactor and decide (because the orders are now generic) that you want the controller to be called "orders" but you don't want to break all your old code. you can do this:

    resources :user_orders, controller: "orders"

And your existing links will continue to work! (plus you can add a "orders" resource to move things over to the new scheme)

There's also neat things like named links:

    match 'exit' => 'sessions#destroy', :as => :logout

I'd also like to add, if you needed to refactor your controller using the old link syntax - you'd still have to change a pile of controller links!

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Then I'm linking to mysite.com/link/add. This is a hard coded url.

No, it's not. link_add_path is a method generated by Rails that points to a specific route in your config/routes.rb. You can see this by running

rake routes | grep link_add

If I change the route that this maps to, I have to change every instance of link_to in my code base to point to the new absolute url. This seems crazy.

No, you don't. Take the following example

get "link/add", as: :link_add, controller: :links, action: :add

If I run the above

rake routes | grep link_add

I get

link_add GET    /link/add(.:format)    links#add

But what if I change the name of my controller to UrisController? Just change the route in config/routes.rb

get "link/add", as: :link_add, controller: :uris, action: :add

and now you have

link_add GET    /link/add(.:format)    uris#add

The link_to's don't have to change because the link_add_path method is still mapped to the newly modified line in my config/routes.rb because the route name is the same. With your more explicit way of specifying controllers/actions for every link_to, you have to go through every link and update it manually to reflect the new controller: :uris controller.

Read about Naming Routes in the rails guide.

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And I'm being down-voted because...? –  Deefour Aug 26 '12 at 3:24
    
I don't know why, but I'll fix it for you. –  sevenseacat Aug 26 '12 at 3:57
    
<3 thanks @Karpie –  Deefour Aug 26 '12 at 5:10

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