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The output of the code below:

rpl = 'This is a nicely escaped newline \\n'
my_string = 'I hope this apple is replaced with a nicely escaped string'
reg = re.compile('apple')
reg.sub( rpl, my_string )

..is:

'I hope this This is a nicely escaped newline \n is replaced with a nicely escaped string'

..so when printed:

I hope this This is a nicely escaped newline

is replaced with a nicely escaped string

So python is unescaping the string when it replaces 'apple' in the other string? For now I've just done

reg.sub( rpl.replace('\\','\\\\'), my_string )

Is this safe? Is there a way to stop Python from doing that?

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When you say 'the output of the code below ... is', does that mean you're using print to determine it? Or a REPL? –  Brian Cain Aug 26 '12 at 4:04
    
@BrianCain, Sorry for being vague. That's what the string looks like. –  mowwwalker Aug 26 '12 at 4:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From help(re.sub) [emphasis mine]:

sub(pattern, repl, string, count=0, flags=0)

Return the string obtained by replacing the leftmost non-overlapping occurrences of the pattern in string by the replacement repl. repl can be either a string or a callable; if a string, backslash escapes in it are processed. If it is a callable, it's passed the match object and must return a replacement string to be used.

One way to get around this is to pass a lambda:

>>> reg.sub(rpl, my_string )
'I hope this This is a nicely escaped newline \n is replaced with a nicely escaped string'
>>> reg.sub(lambda x: rpl, my_string )
'I hope this This is a nicely escaped newline \\n is replaced with a nicely escaped string'
share|improve this answer
    
Weird, wonder why it does that. Thanks for explaining! I've ended up doing rpl.encode('escape_string'), as it makes the code very understandable –  mowwwalker Aug 26 '12 at 4:14
    
@Walkerneo: Replacement patterns are unescaped, but callables are expected to return the exact string that they want to replace (as it's implied they would do any necessary processing already). Hence, the output from a callable replacement is not unescaped. –  nneonneo Aug 26 '12 at 4:20
1  
@nneonneo, Thank you, I understand that, but it does make the code look a bit more cryptic. Someone reading it probably won't see the use in using a lambda expression that just returns a string. –  mowwwalker Aug 26 '12 at 4:25
    
@Walkerneo: if only there were a way to leave a short message in the code for the reader which would explain it.. :^) More seriously, string_escape (not escape_string) seems like a perfectly viable approach. –  DSM Aug 26 '12 at 4:32
2  
The reason backslashes are escaped is that the replacement isn't just a plain string but a regex replacement pattern. It can, for instance, contain backreferences like \1 to include groups from the match. Since at least some escapes have to be processed, it makes sense to process them all. –  BrenBarn Aug 26 '12 at 4:41

All regex patterns used for Python's re module are unescaped, including both search and replacement patterns. This is why the r modifier is generally used with regex patterns in Python, as it reduces the amount of "backwhacking" necessary to write usable patterns.

The r modifier appears before a string constant and basically makes all \ characters (except those before string delimiters) verbatim. So, r'\\' == '\\\\', and r'\n' == '\\n'.

Writing your example as

rpl = r'This is a nicely escaped newline \\n'
my_string = 'I hope this apple is replaced with a nicely escaped string'
reg = re.compile(r'apple')
reg.sub( rpl, my_string )

works as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
The example in the question was a bit contrived and I wouldn't be working with string literals. –  mowwwalker Aug 26 '12 at 4:16

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