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I did selection sort with integers and it was working, when I tried to modify the program to work with generics the compiler is complaining and I don't know how to fix it. If anyone can point some tips and constructive comments I would be grateful. Here is the code.

public class SelelctionSort 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int[] list = {34, 17, 23, 35, 45, 9, 1};
        System.out.println("Original Array: ");
        printArray(list);

        selectionSort(list);
        System.out.println("\nSelection sort:");
        printArray(list);

    }

    //selection sort
    public static <E extends Comparable<E>> void selectionSort(E[] list)
    {
        for(int i=0; i<list.length -1; i++)
        {
            int iSmallest = i;

            for(int j=i+1; j<list.length; j++)
            {
                if(list[iSmallest].compareTo((list[j])) > 0  )
                {
                    iSmallest = j;
                }
            }
            E iSwap = list[iSmallest];
            list[iSmallest] = list[i];
            list[i] = iSwap;

        }
    }

    public static <E> void printArray(E[] list)
    {

        for(int i=0; i<list.length; i++)
        {
            System.out.print(list[i] + ", ");
        }
    }
}

The following is what javac spits out.

SelelctionSort.java:7: error: method printArray in class SelelctionSort cannot be applied to given types;
        printArray(list);
        ^
  required: E[]
  found: int[]
  reason: inferred type does not conform to declared bound(s)
    inferred: int
    bound(s): Object
  where E is a type-variable:
    E extends Object declared in method <E>printArray(E[])
SelelctionSort.java:9: error: method selectionSort in class SelelctionSort cannot be applied to given types;
        selectionSort(list);
        ^
  required: E[]
  found: int[]
  reason: inferred type does not conform to declared bound(s)
    inferred: int
    bound(s): Comparable<int>
  where E is a type-variable:
    E extends Comparable<E> declared in method <E>selectionSort(E[])
SelelctionSort.java:11: error: method printArray in class SelelctionSort cannot be applied to given types;
        printArray(list);
        ^
  required: E[]
  found: int[]
  reason: inferred type does not conform to declared bound(s)
    inferred: int
    bound(s): Object
  where E is a type-variable:
    E extends Object declared in method <E>printArray(E[])
share|improve this question
    
What is the compiler saying to you? –  Paul Bellora Aug 26 '12 at 6:24
    
int does not extend Object –  oldrinb Aug 26 '12 at 6:25
    
The message is: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problems: The method printArray(E[]) in the type SelelctionSort is not applicable for the arguments (int[]) The method selectionSort(E[]) in the type SelelctionSort is not applicable for the arguments (int[]) The method printArray(E[]) in the type SelelctionSort is not applicable for the arguments (int[]) at SelelctionSort.main(SelelctionSort.java:8) –  Doesn't Matter Aug 26 '12 at 6:29
    
I have tried with an array with Object but the compiler is complaining with: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problem: Bound mismatch: The generic method selectionSort(E[]) of type SelelctionSort is not applicable for the arguments (Object[]). The inferred type Object is not a valid substitute for the bounded parameter <E extends Comparable<E>> –  Doesn't Matter Aug 26 '12 at 6:30
1  
@Doesn'tMatter try Integer[] list = {34, 17, 23, 35, 45, 9, 1}; The runtime errors are because Eclipse is bad and compiles code that is invalid. Using javac won't let it compile. –  oldrinb Aug 26 '12 at 6:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
int[] list = {34, 17, 23, 35, 45, 9, 1};
...
selectionSort(list);

You are trying to call selectionSort() which signature is selectionSort(E[]), but int does not extend Comparable (It is a primitive, not even an object) - and thus the types are not matching.

You can try to create an Integer[] and pass it. Integer is an object and it extends Comparable<Integer>.
The alternative is to overload selectionSort() to accept both generic type for objects and to overload it for each needed primitive. This is the solution java uses for its Arrays.sort() method.

The same holds for printArray()

share|improve this answer
    
cheers it is working –  Doesn't Matter Aug 26 '12 at 6:34
1  
@Doesn'tMatter make sure to accept his answer :-) –  oldrinb Aug 26 '12 at 6:36
    
@Doesn'tMatter: I editted the answer - if you want to use primitive (which is often the case) you can overload the method. This is the solution java uses for its sort() –  amit Aug 26 '12 at 6:37

As said above you are using selectionSort(E[]) where E extends Comparable means , your selection sort can take the argument who implemented the Comparable interface. As int is primitive data so it's giving the compilation Error. So if you want generic feature then you can use Wrapper classes, All wrapper classes implemented the Comparable interface. The below code will work, Just edit version of your code

public class SelelctionSort 
{
public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    Integer[] list = {34, 17, 23, 35, 45, 9, 1};
    System.out.println("Original Array: ");
    printArray(list);

    selectionSort(list);
    System.out.println("\nSelection sort:");
    printArray(list);
    Float[] flist = {34.4f, 17.6f, 23.0f};
    selectionSort(list);
}

//selection sort
public static <E extends Comparable<E>> void selectionSort(E[] list)
{
    for(int i=0; i<list.length -1; i++)
    {
        int iSmallest = i;

        for(int j=i+1; j<list.length; j++)
        {
            if(list[iSmallest].compareTo((list[j])) > 0  )
            {
                iSmallest = j;
            }
        }
        E iSwap = list[iSmallest];
        list[iSmallest] = list[i];
        list[i] = iSwap;

    }
}

public static <E> void printArray(E[] list)
{

    for(int i=0; i<list.length; i++)
    {
        System.out.print(list[i] + ", ");
    }
}
}
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