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Background

I'm in the following situation:

I have an Analyzer type that looks roughly as follows

interface Analyzer {
    int computeValue();
    String performAnalysis();
}

implemented by something like

class AnalyzerImpl implements Analyzer {

    @Override
    public int computeValue() {
        return 5;
    }

    @Override
    public String performAnalysis() {
        return "Result: " + computeValue();
    }
}

(In my actual code, performAnalysis performs many computations using several different computeValue methods of varying complexities.)

Now I need to selectively tweak the behavior of an Analyzer object at runtime (or create a wrapper with the tweaked behavior).

What I tried:

I added the tweaking-method:

public Analyzer tweakAnalyzer(Analyzer untweakedAnalyzer) { ... }

and attempted to solve it using the decorator pattern:

class AnalyzerDecorator implements Analyzer {
    Analyzer delegate;
    public AnalyzerDecorator(Analyzer delegate) {
        this.delegate = delegate;
    }

    @Override
    public int computeValue() {
        return delegate.computeValue();
    }

    @Override
    public String performAnalysis() {
        return delegate.performAnalysis();
    }
}

I then implemented tweakAnalyzer as follows:

public Analyzer tweakAnalyzer(Analyzer untweakedAnalyzer) {
    return new AnalyzerDecorator(untweakedAnalyzer) {
        @Override
        public int computeValue() {
            return 1337;              // tweaked value!
        }
    };
}

However, when doing

tweakAnalyzer(new AnalyzerImpl()).performAnalysis();

I get the untweaked value Result: 5, and not Result: 1337 as desired.

(This is because the tweaked analyzer is not the same object as the untweaked analyzer, it's merely a wrapper, so the call to computeValue in AnalyzerImpl doesn't work as intended.)

Full ideone.com example.

TL;DR:

I want to tweak the behavior of an object at runtime. I used the decorator pattern, but "lost" all virtual methods.

Question:

What is the best way to solve this problem, i.e. how should I tweak the behavior of an Analyzer in a way such that I either don't loose the virtual method lookup or such that it doesn't matter if I do?

share|improve this question
    
Might be a stupid question to ask but why not override performAnalysis() when you're doing return new AnalyzerDecorator(untweakedAnalyzer)? –  Sujay Aug 26 '12 at 7:51
    
@Sujay, How should the overridden performAnalysis look? In my actual code, AnalyzerImpl.performAnalysis is a quite long and complicated method. I don't want to duplicate it :-/ –  aioobe Aug 26 '12 at 7:53
2  
Maybe you could use the strategy pattern instead. –  Tom Aug 26 '12 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

The problem is that your decorator isn't called by performAnalysis since it has no idea that you decorated the class.

You should probably break performAnalysis and computeValue into two classes (Analyzer with performAnalysis and Calculator with computeValue)

That way, you can decorate them independently, and pass the decorated calculator into Analyzer a'la performAnalysis(Calculator calculator).

An example at IDEOne. And yes, it's basically the Strategy Pattern in action.

share|improve this answer
    
If you name the Calculator: ComputationStrategy you have a Strategy design pattern. –  dcernahoschi Aug 26 '12 at 8:00
    
This is an interesting option. I'll give this a shot and get back to you. Thanks, especially for the ideone code! –  aioobe Aug 26 '12 at 8:13
    
I've now had a closer look at this. Unfortunately my my computeValue methods call each other (like getTotalCost calls getVariableCosts and getDirectCosts). Thus I believe the problem remains in the Calculator class. –  aioobe Aug 31 '12 at 5:53

Do you have access to the code of the analyzer object? If so, you could design it to be tweakable by using the strategy pattern.

Alternative (template pattern with kind-of multiple dispatch):

abstract class Analyzer {

   public final int ComputeValue () {
      return doComputeValue (this);
   }

   public final string PerformAnalysis () {
      return doPerformAnalysis (this);
   }

   protected abstract int doComputeValue (Analyzer myself);
   protected abstract string doPerformAnalysis (Analyzer myself);
}

class AnalyzerImpl extends Analyzer {

   protected int doComputeValue (Analyzer myself) {
      ...
   }

   protected string doPerformAnalysis (Analyzer myself) {
      return "Result: " + myself.ComputeValue();
   }
}

class AnalyzerDecorator extends Analyzer {
    Analyzer delegate;
    ...
    protected string doPerformAnalysis (Analyzer myself) {
        return delegate.doPerformAnalysis (myself);
    }
    protected int doComputeValue (Analyzer myself) {
        return delegate.doComputeValue (myself);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes this approach struck me too, but there are simply too many methods in Analyzer for this to be feasible. +1 nonetheless. –  aioobe Aug 26 '12 at 8:25
    
Note that you only double the methods in Analyzer, since half of them is final. –  JohnB Aug 26 '12 at 8:26
    
Ah, you changed the interface to an abstract class. That's of course nice. –  aioobe Aug 26 '12 at 9:19

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