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With this sort of code:

    public void UpdateCellFont(int id, string colName, Font font)
    {
        CellLocation location = new CellLocation(id, colName);

        if (CellAppearances.ContainsKey(location))
        {
            CellAppearances[location].Font = font;
        }
        else
        {
            CellAppearance cell = new CellAppearance(font, _DefaultBackColor, _DefaultForeColor);
            CellAppearances.Add(location, cell);
        }
    }

    public void UpdateCellBackColor(int id, string colName, Color backColor)
    {
        CellLocation location = new CellLocation(id, colName);

        if (CellAppearances.ContainsKey(location))
        {
            CellAppearances[location].BackColor = backColor;
        }
        else
        {
            CellAppearance cell = new CellAppearance(_DefaultFont, backColor, _DefaultForeColor);
            CellAppearances.Add(location, cell);
        }
    }

    public void UpdateCellForeColor(int id, string colName, Color foreColor)
    {
        CellLocation location = new CellLocation(id, colName);

        if (CellAppearances.ContainsKey(location))
        {
            CellAppearances[location].ForeColor = foreColor;
        }
        else
        {
            CellAppearance cell = new CellAppearance(_DefaultFont, _DefaultBackColor, foreColor);
            CellAppearances.Add(location, cell);
        }
    }

The methods all do almost the same thing - each one updates Font, BackColor or ForeColor (or if there is no entry in the dictionary they create a new one.

How can I reduce the duplication here when they are acting on a strongly typed CellAppearance?

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

what about that straight-forward?

public CellAppearance GetAppearance(int id, string colName){
    var location = new CellLocation(id, colName);
    if(!CellAppearances.ContainsKey(location))
       CellAppearances.Add(location, cell);
    return CellAppearances[location];
}

// usage:
GetAppearance(1,"hello").Font = myFont;
GetAppearance(2,"blubb").BackColor = myColor;
share|improve this answer
    
OK so 'cell' would be created with default values. And then I'd still have three methods (UpdateFont, UpdateBackColor, UpdateForeColor) but these should just call the one line GetAppearance(id,"colName").Font = font etc? –  user1622713 Aug 27 '12 at 7:11
    
yes... right.. in YOUR solution you even create first a default style and then just update the specific setting... imho it's clean and simple this way... –  TheHe Aug 27 '12 at 7:48
    
F*** i've no idea how to accept your change... looks nice -- more correct than mine ;) –  TheHe Aug 27 '12 at 11:34

Delegates to the rescue!

In this case, TheHe's answer should fit the bill but in general you can solve such situations by using a delegate as method parameter (and organizing your main method a bit differently):

public void UpdateCellProperty (int id, string colName,
                                Action<CellAppearance> appearanceAction)
{
    CellAppearance cell;

    CellLocation location = new CellLocation(id, colName);
    if (CellAppearances.ContainsKey(location))
    {
        cell = CellAppearances[location];
    }
    else
    {
        cell = new CellAppearance(_DefaultFont, _DefaultBackColor,
                                  _DefaultForeColor);
    }
    appearanceAction(cell);
}

public void UpdateCellFont(int id, string colName, Font font)
{
    UpdateCellProperty(id, colName, c => c.Font = font);
}

public void UpdateCellBackColor(int id, string colName, Color backColor)
{
    UpdateCellProperty(id, colName, c => c.BackColor = backColor);
}

public void UpdateCellForeColor(int id, string colName, Color foreColor)
{
    UpdateCellProperty(id, colName, c => c.ForeColor = foreColor);
}

I've seen this pattern been referred to as "hole in the middle pattern". Quite appropriate: you define a method body with a "hole" that is injected with a delegate.

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c'mon!! it's the same overblown code, and num_functions+1... –  TheHe Aug 26 '12 at 8:50
    
@TheHe You mean -1 ? :) All the same. You're right it's not as concise as your solution but I wanted to point out a generic pattern for "Refactoring Similar Methods". It has has served me well in many occasions. It isolates the repetitive part from the variable code. The core method tends to be very stable and in the delegates one can concentrate on the task itself without ceremonial code. –  Gert Arnold Aug 26 '12 at 12:07

It's the conditionality of these methods that makes them complicated and duplicitive. If the Appearance already exists, you do one thing; if it doesn't, you do something else. So ensure that the Appearance exists:

public void EnsureCellAppearance(CellLocation location)
{
    if (CellAppearances.ContainsKey(location))
        return;
    CellAppearances.Add(location, new CellAppearance(_DefaultFont, _DefaultBackColor, _DefaultForeColor));
}

And now your methods are much simpler:

public void UpdateCellFont(int id, string colName, Font font)
{
    CellLocation location = new CellLocation(id, colName);
    EnsureCellAppearance(location);
    CellAppearances[location].Font = font;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that is part of the way there - but notice that it is Font, BackColor and ForeColor (there are actually more but I cut it back for clarity) that need to be updated. So I'd still need three methods - UpdateCellFont, UpdateForeColor, UpdateBackColor... –  user1622713 Aug 27 '12 at 7:06

You would probably have to use reflection to generalize the code to several fields of different types. Not sure it is worth it.

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