Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The code is:

struct m1
{
    public int a;
    public int b;
}

int main()
{
    List <m1> mList;
    m1.initialize;
    //new. and add some items to it.

now I want to access the objects in mList at first I tried:

    for each(m1 it in mList)
    {
        m1.a = 5;
    }

but it failed. becuase after the for each I wrote m1.first().a on console. it was it's initialized value not 5.

then I tried

    for (int counter = 0; counter < mList.size(); counter++)
    {
        m1 it = mList[counter];
        it.a = 5;
    }

again the same problem.

then I tried

    for (int counter = 0; counter < mList.size(); counter++)
    {
        mList[counter].a = 5;
    }

it even didn't compiled. it gives me an error. it says something about not being modifiable return value of list.this[int].

then I tried

    for (int counter = 0; counter < mList.size(); counter++)
    {
        var m1 it = mList[counter];
        it.a = 5;
    }

it didn't work too. I tried all I could and everything that I found in internet and this site. Could you please help you to find a way to access parameters of objects(of type struct) in list? Obviously it is easy when list is made from objects(from classes). it comes to complication if I want to made a list from objects of structs. Any help would highly welcomed.

share|improve this question
    
console.writeline(mlist.First().a) –  Masoud Aug 26 '12 at 8:38
    
for sure there should be a way. it couldn't be completely impossible. it means that I can't access to objects in list??? –  Masoud Aug 26 '12 at 8:40
    
@Masoud: My suspicion is that you don't understand how value types work. You don't have "objects" at all - you have values of a value type. –  Jon Skeet Aug 26 '12 at 8:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The problem is that you've put a struct in a list. When you fetch it from the list, that will create a copy - so modifying it won't do any good. Given your comments, it's possible that you're confused about how value types and reference types work in C#, in which case I suggest you read my article on the topic (or books, or MSDN etc).

You'd need to fetch it, modify the copy, then replace the value in the list:

var copy = list[index];
copy.a = 5;
list[index] = copy;

However, I would strongly advise against creating mutable value types in the first place, partly because they cause exactly this sort of problem. Value types should usually be used for more "fundamental" values which can't be changed in place. It doesn't make sense to change what "the number 5" means, for example, or "January 1st at 10am". If you change the meaning, you've got a new value - so force that to genuinely be a new value.

It's unclear (due to lack of context) whether you should be creating an immutable value type and replacing it in the list, or creating a mutable reference type (a class) instead. Or possibly even an immutable reference type, as that can often aid readability.

I'd also advise against using public fields - use properties instead, to separate implementation details from the type's API.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't anyway of avoiding these copy works? speed is very very important in my program. –  Masoud Aug 26 '12 at 8:42
1  
@Masoud: I suggest you understand how the language works before you start trying to micro-optimize. –  Jon Skeet Aug 26 '12 at 8:44
    
I used structs because I should keep million objects of a special type in memory. and if I create them as class objects their too space consuming. I need a very compact type. –  Masoud Aug 26 '12 at 8:46
    
@Masoud: A million objects really isn't that many. But again - get something working in the most natural, elegant, readable way first, then measure performance, then optimize if necessary. –  Jon Skeet Aug 26 '12 at 8:48
    
I get what you said. I used to code in c++. it was really easier to handle such things with great power of pointers and other things but as I said I need to keep lots of objects in memory and class objects are very big for this work so I tired to use structs instead of them. is there any thing that I missed? –  Masoud Aug 26 '12 at 8:48

Try this:

m1 temp ;
for (int counter = 0; counter < mList.size(); counter++)
    {
        temp = mList[counter];
        temp.a = 5;
        mList[counter] = temp
    }
share|improve this answer

if you are interesting to work with struct without using a temporary variable: use a struct collection:

           m1[] mList = new m1[100];
            //initialize 100 items

            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            {
                mList[i].a = 5;
            }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.