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I'm running a simple test and i get a strange behaviour, here is the js code:

 var handler = function(index,params){

    params.id = index;

}

function test(){
    var params = {'id':0};
    console.log(params);
    gradualRepetitionCalls(0,10,params);
}



function gradualRepetitionCalls(index, maxIndex,params) 
{
    if (index < maxIndex) 
    {
        handler(index,params);
        index++;

        gradualRepetitionCalls(index,maxIndex,params);
    }
}

test();

The strange thing is that the console.log(params) shows that the id is '9' while i would expect it to be '0'. Is console.log() asynchronous?

share|improve this question
    
A shorter test case would be: var a = {'id': 0}; console.log(a); a.id = 1; –  Blender Aug 26 '12 at 9:06
    
This is taken from a much more complex function and simplified for the question purposes, that is why it is structured like this. –  fatman Aug 26 '12 at 9:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, your code snippet is overly complex, try this:

var params = {id: 0};
console.log(params);
params.id = 1;

In Firefox it shows:

Object { id=0 }

but when I click on an object to drill down, it show id=1. In Google Chrome it just shows Object, but id=1 when drilled down.

The reason for this odd behaviour is that console understand that you are logging an object (not just a string) and every time you look at the console or refresh it, it display the current state of that object.

If you find this behaviour error-prone and counter-intuitive, here are some workarounds:

console.log(JSON.stringify(params));
console.log(params.id);

Also note that this is how JavaScript debuggers work, it's not JavaScript's fault per se.

share|improve this answer

No, console.log is synchronous. But you create only one object and "output" this object to the console - after that, you alter the properties of this object (objects are passed by reference!). The console just shows the recent state of this object, not a snapshot from the point of time when it has been logged.

share|improve this answer
    
but this is counter intuitive, when i console.log the object i expect it to log the current state not the state after the script ended. Also, if i log it inside the loop it will show me the same objet 9 times, but if i log just the id it shows the correct id for each iteration??? –  fatman Aug 26 '12 at 9:09

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