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Was wondering if the following is possible:

Currently, I have a subset of nodes in a graph, (graph A), which belongs in another separate and larger graph (graph B).

I would like to preserve the layout from graph B pertaining to this subset of nodes when running a layout generation algorithm on graph A. Could be any of the layout algorithms.

 layout.circle(graph, params)
 layout.sphere(graph, params)
 layout.fruchterman.reingold(graph, ..., dim=2, params)
 layout.kamada.kawai(graph, ..., dim=2, params)
 layout.spring(graph, ..., params)
 layout.reingold.tilford(graph, ..., params)
 layout.fruchterman.reingold.grid(graph, ..., params)
 layout.lgl(graph, ..., params)
 layout.graphopt(graph, ..., params=list())
 layout.mds(graph, dist=NULL, dim=2, options=igraph.arpack.default)
 layout.svd(graph, d=shortest.paths(graph), ...)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the minx, maxx, miny and maxy arguments of layout.fruchterman.reingold() or layout.kamada.kawai() to fix some vertices completely. These arguments specify vertex-specific lower and/or upper limits for the coordinates.

For the vertices you want to fix, set them exactly to the value to fix, and for the other vertices set minx to some small negative values (-Inf might work, too), and set maxx to some large value, (again, maybe Inf works, too).

You might need to use the rescale=FALSE argument in plot.igraph() to avoid rescaling the complete layout, for both the first and second graph.

Edit:

From the manual:

'minx' If not 'NULL', then it must be a numeric vector that gives lower boundaries for the 'x' coordinates of the vertices. The length of the vector must match the number of vertices in the graph.

'maxx' Similar to 'minx', but gives the upper boundaries.

For example:

g <- graph.star(10, center=1)

minx <- rep(-Inf, vcount(g))
maxx <- rep( Inf, vcount(g))
minx[1] <- 0
maxx[1] <- 0
lay <- layout.fruchterman.reingold(g, minx=minx, maxx=maxx, miny=minx, maxy=maxx)

plot(g, layout=lay)

fixes the first vertex into (0,0) (might be modified by rescaling, to avoid rescaling, use rescale=FALSE in plot() and set the plotting limits).

enter image description here

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"You can use the minx, maxx, miny and maxy arguments of layout.fruchterman.reingold() or layout.kamada.kawai() to fix some vertices completely. These arguments specify vertex-specific lower and/or upper limits for the coordinates." How do the arguments work to be vector specific? ie. how to set the max and min xyz values for each vertex? This certainly wouldnt work layout.fruchterman.reingold(graph,minx=1,maxx=1.1) could it be layout.fruchterman.reingold(graph,minx=c(1,2,3),maxx=c(1,1.2.1,3.1)) ? –  Buthetleon Aug 28 '12 at 7:47
    
Edited my answer to show how this works. –  Gabor Csardi Aug 28 '12 at 18:29
    
if I were to have switched off rescale, the output will often be very large? will using layout.norm work in this case? if i set the limits to 1,-1,1,-1 ? –  Buthetleon Aug 29 '12 at 5:57
    
I am not sure what you mean by 'very large'. The plotting window or the PDF file (if you're plotting into PDF) won't be any larger. If you use rescale=FALSE, then you are controlling all sizes on the plot: vertex sizes, etc. It is not very difficult, there is an example here. –  Gabor Csardi Aug 29 '12 at 14:03
    
ok thanks! got it working! thanks soooo much :) –  Buthetleon Aug 30 '12 at 8:21

The layout in igraph is defined as a n (number of nodes) by 2 matrix where the first column indicates the x-coordinate (on a arbitrary scale) and the second column the y-coordinate. You can store the result of any of these functions to obtain this matrix, and then pass that to the layout argument when you plot another graph.

library("igraph")

# A 3-node network:
g <- graph.adjacency(matrix(1,3,3))

# Obtain a layout:
l <- layout.circle(g)

# A different 3-node network:
g2 <- graph.adjacency(matrix(0,3,3))

# Plot second network with layout based on first network:
plot(g2,layout=l)

Edit

If you have a subset of a graph you can simply index this matrix. E.g.:

# A 3-node network:
g <- graph.adjacency(matrix(1,3,3))

# Obtain a layout:
l <- layout.circle(g)

# A 2-node subset:
g2 <- graph.adjacency(matrix(1,2,2))

# Plot second network with layout based on first network:
plot(g2,layout=l[1:2,])
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thanks sacha. However, this isnt the answer I was looking for. A is not a subset of B, neither is B a subset of A. The nodes whose coordinates I'm trying to manually set, belong to a larger graph (graph A) which has nodes not found in B. After fixing the nodes of interest in A following the layout of the same nodes in graph B, I would like to "re-cluster" the remaining nodes in A again without touching those which i've fixed so that it'll look "orderly" again. –  Buthetleon Aug 26 '12 at 13:26

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