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I'm trying to understand the "power" of functors.

Okay, so they are pointers to functions, but what can they do that other classes that didn't implement operator() can't do?

For instance :

#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;


class MultiplyBy
{
    private:
        int factor;

    public:
        MultiplyBy(int x) : factor(x) {}

        int operator () (int other) const
        {
            return factor * other;
        }
};


int main()
{

    MultiplyBy temp(5);
    int myResult = temp(5);  // now myResult holds 25
    cout << myResult << endl;
    return 0;
}

And we take his other friend

class MultiplyOther
{
    private:
        int factor;
    public:
        MultiplyOther(int x) : factor(x) {}
        int invokeMultiplyMe(int _other)
        {
            return _other * factor;
        }
};

And do the same thing:

int main()
{
    // MultiplyOther

    MultiplyOther notFunctor(4);
    int myOther = notFunctor.invokeMultiplyMe(3);
    cout << myOther << endl;
    return 0;
}

And we get:

25
12

Then, what's the real power of the functor? Do both classes save the state, or am I missing something here?

share|improve this question
    
true power hides in lambdas I think –  Mr.Anubis Aug 26 '12 at 13:01
    
@Mr.Anubis: Lambdas are syntactic sugar for functors, they don't have any more power. –  interjay Aug 26 '12 at 13:04
    
@interjay you can define them at the point of call , capture variables etc . Can you do that with simple functors without passing them as args etc? –  Mr.Anubis Aug 26 '12 at 13:08
    
@Mr.Anubis: You can define a local class right before the call. Variable captures in lambdas are syntactic sugar for storing them in class members. Anything that can be done with a lambda can also be done with a functor (though it may be much more verbose). The reverse is not true. –  interjay Aug 26 '12 at 13:15
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For one, they have a unified signature that can be used e.g. by algorithms that only need to know that they have to call something.

In your example, an instance of MultiplyBy could be used by any code that expects to call something that takes an int and returns one (or types that are constructible from /convertible to int). Using your second example would require the code to have knowledge of the invokeMultiplyByMe method.

Note that functors are not pointers to functions at all, as stated in the question. They are classes whose instances can be called with the syntax of a function call.

share|improve this answer
    
Aha! "Using your second example would require the code to have knowledge of the invokeMultiplyByMe method" Didn't see it coming , +1 ! –  ron Aug 26 '12 at 13:11
    
@ron BTW, I just saw "... they are pointers to functions..." in your question. This is not true. –  juanchopanza Aug 26 '12 at 14:07
    
Also of interest: typically functors can be aggressively inlined, making code such as for_each(start, end, functor) typically run faster than for_each(start, end, func_ptr) –  bstamour Aug 26 '12 at 20:10
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Functors do not have any special properties over classes, but they can be used as functions with higher capabilities. A function usually cannot have state, and if it has (by using a static variable) the state is shared among all function calls.\

A functor has all the properties of a class (state, especially), but can be used as a function. A great example is a functor used for STL algorithms:

class Add
{
  public:
    Add(){sum = 0;};
    void operator()(int i)
    {
        sum += i;
    }
    int getSum(){return sum;};

    private:
    int sum;
}

int main()
{

std::vector<int> vint;
vint.push_back(2);
vint.push_back(3);
vint.push_back(4);
}

Add adder;

adder = std::for_each( vint.begin(); vint.end(), adder);

cout << adder.getSum();
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"so they are pointers to functions" - Function pointers and functors are completely different. Former is just a plain pointer to an original function. It does not hold any state. However, functor or function object holds a state. Functor is any class that defines operator(). So, any object of that kind of class can be called in a manner of a function.

Code snippet from C++ primer...

template<class T>
class TooBig
{
    private:
    T cutoff;
    public:
    TooBig(const T & t) : cutoff(t) {}
    bool operator()(const T & v) { return v > cutoff; }
};

With this class we can create multiple objects with different cutoff values. TooBig cutoff1(10); TooBig cutOff2(20);

One of the best places to use a functor is in templates. For ex, take list template. It has a remove_if function which removes any values in the list which returns true from the argument.

list list1; // lets say it has some values list list2; // lets say it has some values

now, a call to list1.remove_if(cutoff1); // applies all the elments of list1 and removes those which are greater than the value stored in cutOff1. Similar thing for list2.

thx!

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