Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Does anyone know if this pattern has a name? I tend to use it a fair amount.

Basically it is a behavioral pattern that allows you provide a method with an enumerable of classes that implement an interface, and it runs all of them. Here is a C# example:

interface IInputValidator
{
    bool IsValid(int input);
}

class GreaterThanZeroValidator : IInputValidator
{
    public bool IsValid(int input)
    {
        return input > 0;
    }
}

class LessThanOneThousandValidator : IInputValidator
{
    public bool IsValid(int input)
    {
        return input < 1000;
    }
}

then the method that uses these:

public void ValidateInput(int input, IEnumerable<IInputValidator> validators)
{
    bool allValid = true;
    foreach(var validator in validators)
    {
        if(!validator.IsValid(input))
            allValid = false;
    }

    if(!allValid)
        throw new ArgumentException();
}

So to me it looks a lot like a Strategy pattern, but with multiple strategies that all get a chance to handle the input, whereas the normal Strat pattern just takes in 1 strategy.

It is also a little like a Chain of Responsibility, except that in a normal CoR, the handlers are only iterated deep enough to find the 1 that can handle the input, and each responsibility has a reference to the next responsibility (like a linked list), whereas in my example, I pass them all in together.

I'm just looking to put a name to this thing. Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question

IMHO this is Chain-Of-Responsibility. The reason is that the LINQ All extension terminates the moment it reaches the first item that causes the predicate to return false.

Here's LINQPad code to prove my claim about All:

void Main()
{
    try
    {
        Console.WriteLine("all items are 2?");
        Console.WriteLine(YieldOneThenThrow().All(i => i == 2));
        Console.WriteLine("all items are 1?");
        Console.WriteLine(YieldOneThenThrow().All(i => i == 1));
    }
    catch (NotSupportedException)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("exception! second item was visited.");
    }
}

IEnumerable<int> YieldOneThenThrow()
{
    yield return 1;
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

...and the output:

all items are 2?
False
all items are 1?
exception! second item was visited.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. I used Linq to make the sample code shorter. I'm going to edit my code to do a full foreach for all the items. Sorry! – CodingWithSpike Aug 26 '12 at 15:21
    
@rally25rs - no problem. :) I do a lot of UI work and this item hits home. One of the things I hate as a user is when a page only notifies me of only the first invalid item rather than all of the things I need to fix. So see the utility in a "collect all issues" pattern even if that's just one use of this. – devgeezer Aug 26 '12 at 20:38
    
Yep, the 2 places I usually use it are to "collect all validation issues" or to "run all these business rules". – CodingWithSpike Aug 26 '12 at 21:07

But yeah, the strategy pattern is designed, and the consumption is chain of responsibility.

It depends on what the user will get - If the user is provided ValidateInput I'll class it as CoR. If the user is given the first set of classes only, then I'd call it Strategy.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.