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Is there a Python function similar to the expand.grid() function in R ? Thanks in advance.

(EDIT) Below are the description of this R function and an example.

Create a Data Frame from All Combinations of Factors

Description:

     Create a data frame from all combinations of the supplied vectors
     or factors.  

> x <- 1:3
> y <- 1:3
> expand.grid(x,y)
  Var1 Var2
1    1    1
2    2    1
3    3    1
4    1    2
5    2    2
6    3    2
7    1    3
8    2    3
9    3    3

(EDIT2) Below is an example with the rpy package. I would like to get the same output object but without using R :

>>> from rpy import *
>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> b = [5,7,9]
>>> r.assign("a",a)
[1, 2, 3]
>>> r.assign("b",b)
[5, 7, 9]
>>> r("expand.grid(a,b)")
{'Var1': [1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3], 'Var2': [5, 5, 5, 7, 7, 7, 9, 9, 9]}

EDIT 02/09/2012: I'm really lost with Python. Lev Levitsky's code given in his answer does not work for me:

>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> b = [5,7,9]
>>> expandgrid(a, b)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in expandgrid
NameError: global name 'itertools' is not defined

However the itertools module seems to be installed (typing from itertools import * does not return any error message)

share|improve this question
5  
The people most likely to help are Python users. Since they may not be familiar with R, perhaps you could provide a summary of what expand.grid does? Maybe even a small example? – GSee Aug 26 '12 at 14:26
    
Also, the expand.grid function operates on factors and returns a data frame, neither of which are built-in data types in Python. What are the equivalents you're interested in working with (for example, does it take 1d lists and return a 2d list? – David Robinson Aug 26 '12 at 14:35
    
@DavidRobinson The pandas Python package handles objects very close to R dataframes. Ideally, I would like such an object. – Stéphane Laurent Aug 26 '12 at 14:39
1  
Looks like it's basically a Cartesian product, so if you don't find a standard solution, it shouldn't be too hard to implement it with itertools.product. – Lev Levitsky Aug 26 '12 at 14:43
    
@LevLevitsky: product appears to be a "standard solution", and would probably make a good answer to OP's question. – Joel Cornett Aug 26 '12 at 14:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's an example that gives output similar to what you need:

import itertools
def expandgrid(*itrs):
   product = list(itertools.product(*itrs))
   return {'Var{}'.format(i+1):[x[i] for x in product] for i in range(len(itrs))}

>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> b = [5,7,9]
>>> expandgrid(a, b)
{'Var1': [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3], 'Var2': [5, 7, 9, 5, 7, 9, 5, 7, 9]}

The difference is related to the fact that in itertools.product the rightmost element advances on every iteration. You can tweak the function by sorting the product list smartly if it's important.

share|improve this answer
    
This code does not work for me (please see my edit). – Stéphane Laurent Sep 2 '12 at 8:19
    
@StéphaneLaurent Have you done import itertools before using itertools.product? Sorry, I should have included it from the beginning. – Lev Levitsky Sep 2 '12 at 8:29
    
Thanks ! That works ! – Stéphane Laurent Sep 2 '12 at 8:32

I've wondered this for a while and I haven't been satisfied with the solutions put forward so far, so I came up with my own, which is considerably simpler (but probably slower). The function uses numpy.meshgrid to make the grid, then flattens the grids into 1d arrays and puts them together:

def expand_grid(x, y):
    xG, yG = np.meshgrid(x, y) # create the actual grid
    xG = xG.flatten() # make the grid 1d
    yG = yG.flatten() # same
    return pd.DataFrame({'x':xG, 'y':yG}) # return a dataframe

For example:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

p, q = np.linspace(1, 10, 10), np.linspace(1, 10, 10)

def expand_grid(x, y):
    xG, yG = np.meshgrid(x, y) # create the actual grid
    xG = xG.flatten() # make the grid 1d
    yG = yG.flatten() # same
    return pd.DataFrame({'x':xG, 'y':yG})

print expand_grid(p, q).head(n = 20)

I know this is an old post, but I thought I'd share my simple version!

share|improve this answer

Just use list comprehensions:

>>> [(x, y) for x in range(5) for y in range(5)]

[(0, 0), (0, 1), (0, 2), (0, 3), (0, 4), (1, 0), (1, 1), (1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 0), (2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 3), (2, 4), (3, 0), (3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 3), (3, 4), (4, 0), (4, 1), (4, 2), (4, 3), (4, 4)]

convert to numpy array if desired:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.array([(x, y) for x in range(5) for y in range(5)])
>>> x.shape
(25, 2)

I have tested for up to 10000 x 10000 and performance of python is comparable to that of expand.grid in R. Using a tuple (x, y) is about 40% faster than using a list [x, y] in the comprehension.

OR...

Around 3x faster with np.meshgrid and much less memory intensive.

%timeit np.array(np.meshgrid(range(10000), range(10000))).reshape(2, 100000000).T
1 loops, best of 3: 736 ms per loop

in R:

> system.time(expand.grid(1:10000, 1:10000))
   user  system elapsed 
  1.991   0.416   2.424 

Keep in mind that R has 1-based arrays whereas Python is 0-based.

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Here's another version which returns a pandas.DataFrame:

import itertools as it
import pandas as pd

def expand_grid(*args, **kwargs):
    columns = []
    lst = []
    if args:
        columns += xrange(len(args))
        lst += args
    if kwargs:
        columns += kwargs.iterkeys()
        lst += kwargs.itervalues()
    return pd.DataFrame(list(it.product(*lst)), columns=columns)

print expand_grid([0,1], [1,2,3])
print expand_grid(a=[0,1], b=[1,2,3])
print expand_grid([0,1], b=[1,2,3])
share|improve this answer

product from itertools is the key to your solution. It produces a cartesian product of the inputs.

from itertools import product

def expand_grid(dictionary):
   return pd.DataFrame([row for row in product(*dictionary.values())], 
                       columns=dictionary.keys())

dictionary = {'color': ['red', 'green', 'blue'], 
              'vehicle': ['car', 'van', 'truck'], 
              'cylinders': [6, 8]}

>>> expand_grid(dictionary)
    color  cylinders vehicle
0     red          6     car
1     red          6     van
2     red          6   truck
3     red          8     car
4     red          8     van
5     red          8   truck
6   green          6     car
7   green          6     van
8   green          6   truck
9   green          8     car
10  green          8     van
11  green          8   truck
12   blue          6     car
13   blue          6     van
14   blue          6   truck
15   blue          8     car
16   blue          8     van
17   blue          8   truck
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