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Consider the following code, which is a scheme of storing a callback function as a member, and then using it:

class MyClass {
  function __construct($callback) {
    $this->callback = $callback;
  }

  function makeCall() {
    return $this->callback();
  }
}

function myFunc() {
  return 'myFunc was here';
}

$o = new MyClass(myFunc);
echo $o->makeCall();

I would expect myFunc was here to be echoed, but instead I get:

Call to undefined method MyClass::callback()

Can anyone explain what's wrong here, and what I can do in order to get the desired behaviour?

In case it matters, I am using PHP 5.3.13.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can change your makeCall method to this:

function makeCall() {
  $func = $this->callback; 
  return $func();
}
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is this php5.4 syntax? –  Juris Malinens Aug 26 '12 at 15:39
    
It works with my version 5.4.4. But the call_user_func works too and avoids adding one var. –  samura Aug 26 '12 at 15:41
    
Well, it works for me (PHP 5.3.13), and it does not require changing the code that uses the class, only the class itself :) –  Tom Aug 26 '12 at 15:43
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Pass it as a string and call it by call_user_func.

class MyClass {
  function __construct($callback) {
    $this->callback = $callback;
  }

  function makeCall() {
    return call_user_func($this->callback);
  }
}

function myFunc() {
  return 'myFunc was here';
}

$o = new MyClass("myFunc");
echo $o->makeCall();
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I feel very uneasy with referencing functions using strings and with call_user_func (I guess that's what PHP does behind the scenes anyway, but I like code which can pretend that's not the case better). –  Tom Aug 26 '12 at 15:45
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One important thing about PHP is that it recognises the type of a symbol with the syntax rather than the contents of it, so you need to state explicitly what you refer to.
In many languages you just write:

myVariable
myFunction
myConstant
myClass
myClass.myStaticMethod
myObject.myMethod

And the parser/compiler knows what each of the symbols means, because it's aware of what they refer to simply by knowing what's assigned to them.
In PHP, however, you need to use the syntax to let the parser know what "symbol namespace" you refer to, so normally you write:

$myVariable
myFunction()
myConstant
new myClass
myClass::myStaticMethod()
$myObject->method()

However, as you can see these are calls rather than references. To pass a reference to a function, class or method in PHP, combined string and array syntax is used:

'myFunction'
array('myClass', 'myStaticMethod')
array($myObject, 'myMethod')

In your case, you need to use 'myFunc' in place of myFunc to let PHP know that you're passing a reference to a function and not retrieving the value the myFunc constant.

Another ramification is that when you write $myObject->callback(), PHP assumes callback is a method because of the parentheses and it does not attempt to loop up a property.
To achieve the expected result, you need to either store a copy of/reference to the property callback in a local variable and use the following syntax:

$callback = $this->callback;
return $callback();

which identifies it as a closure, because of the dollar sign and the parentheses; or call it with the call_user_func function:

call_user_func($this->callback);

which, on the other hand, is a built-in function that expects callback.

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Thanks for the detailed explanation! –  Tom Aug 26 '12 at 17:11
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