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Consider the following model setup:

Model A
  has one B1, type: B
  has one B2, type: B

Model B
  has many A

I want to be able have this work:

class Motorcycle < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :front_tire, class_name: "Tire"
  has_one :back_tire, class_name: "Tire"
end

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :motorcycles
end

The end result would be me being able to do this:

m = Motorcycle.new
ft = Tire.new
bt = Tire.new
m.front_tire = ft
m.back_tire = bt
m.save
Tire.first.motorcycles #=> [...]
share|improve this question
    
Pair has_one against belongs_to, always. – DGM Aug 26 '12 at 17:16

You can't have has_many paired with has_one, has_* needs to be paired with belongs_to (of course with exception of has_many :through).

So, you need to either change to motorcycle belongs_to :front_tire or create a third join model.

share|improve this answer
    
Changing belongs_to would mean I can't use ft.motorcycles which fails the requirement. – krainboltgreene Aug 26 '12 at 16:27
    
A join table means I can't have the position attribute. – krainboltgreene Aug 26 '12 at 16:27
    
of course you can have a position attribute with join model (join model to use with has_many :through, e.g. TireInstallation, not join table for habtm). that's what the join models are for. – Tomasz Stachewicz Aug 26 '12 at 16:29
    
I mean that you can't reference the join table's columns in the conditions option of has_*. I think the solution here is a join model, like you're now suggesting. I think I just skipped over that open. – krainboltgreene Aug 26 '12 at 16:33

This is not tested at all but how about something like this:

has_many :motorcycles,
         :class_name => 'Motorcycle',
         :finder_sql => proc { "select * from motorcycles
                         where front_tire_id = #{id} OR
                         back_tire_id = #{id}" }
share|improve this answer
    
That handles only one side, and not the other. I'd also like Rails to elagantly handle it. Seems like this shouldn't be an issue. – krainboltgreene Aug 26 '12 at 15:58

I think something like this should work

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :motorcycle
end

change the has_many :motercycles to belongs_to :motorcycle

Motorcycle has many tires (through has_one) Tires belong to motorcycle

or you could have used something like

class Motorcycle < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tires
end

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :motorcycle
end

with Tire containing a column position wich may hold values for front or back

you could create some constants in model to maintain those like

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
 FROUT 1
 BACK 2
 #....
end

This is just an another option :)

share|improve this answer
    
This fails as I can't do ft.motorcycles. – krainboltgreene Aug 26 '12 at 16:28
2  
it will be ft.motorcycle as it is has one – PriteshJ Aug 26 '12 at 16:31

I think you're looking for basic Single-table Inheritance, as front tires and back tires really aren't the same thing, but rather specific types of tires. To facilitate this, you would need to add a type string column to your tires table, and declare two sub-classes of the Tire class:

class Motorcycle < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :front_tire
  belongs_to :back_tire
end

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
end

class FrontTire < Tire
  has_many :motorcycles
end

class BackTire < Tire
  has_many :motorcycles
end

This would allow you to use Tire.first, which would return either an instance of FrontTire or BackTire, which would have many motorcycles. This fulfills your Tire.first.motorcycles requirement.

m = Motorcycle.new
ft = FrontTire.new # id 1
bt = BackTire.new  # id 2
m.front_tire = ft
m.back_tire = bt
m.save
Tire.first.motorcycles # returns FrontTire #1

# Or, find specifically by tire type
FrontTire.first.motorcycles # all motorcycles with this front-tire
BackTire.first.motorcycles  # all motorcycles with this back-tire

Alternatively, you could simply use a generic tires relationship, now that front and back tires are different classes:

class Motorcycle
  has_many :tires
end

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
end

class FrontTire < Tire
  has_many :motorcycles, foreign_key: :tire_id
end

class BackTire < Tire
  has_many :motorcycles, foreign_key: :tire_id
end

Npw Motorcycle.first.tires would return an array of two objects, one instance of a FrontTire and one instance of a BackTire. You would likely want to add a validator to prevent multiple front/back tires being assigned to the same motorcycle.

share|improve this answer
    
This is more on the right track, but I disagree with the relationship. The simple english tells the story: A tire belongs_to an motorcycle. A motorcycle has_one :front_tire and has_one :back_tire. It simply sounds wrong to say that a tire has_many motorcycles. – DGM Aug 26 '12 at 17:15
    
The simple English isn't really relevant in this case. The foreign key belongs in Motorcycle: A Motorcycle needs to know what kind of front-tire is uses, and which kind of back-tire it uses. The fact that Rails has only one way of expression this relationship ("belongs to") is a failing in the way Rails tries to boil down many types of database relatonship to a single English-language concept. The database implementation is correct; that Rails can't adequately express it doesn't mean you should use an incorrect database implementation. – meagar Aug 26 '12 at 17:28
    
And it might help to clarify that we're not talking about specific physical instances of this motorcycle "belongs to" this particualr piece-of-round-rubber. We're saying that "A Dunlop part #12345 Front Tire is used by these models of motorcycles" and "This 2012 Kawasaki motorcycle uses a Dunlop part #54321 rear tire". The fact that Rails needs to boil down this mutual-ownership to a belongs_to/has_many is simply Rails failing to provide the English-language equivalent for this particular relationship. – meagar Aug 26 '12 at 17:30
2  
I guess the point being that I've just convinced myself that this should be a mutual has-and-belongs-to-many relationship with a joining table between motorcycles and tires; A specific type of tire can belong to many motorcycles and visa-versa. – meagar Aug 26 '12 at 17:34
    
Ok, I guess I would have named it TireModel or TireType or something. Yes, if if the tire is a type that can be on many motorcycles, it looks like you need a many to many relationship. – DGM Aug 26 '12 at 21:56

I managed to solve it with this set of code:

class Motorcycle < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tire_brands
  has_one :front_tire, class_name: "Tire"
  has_one :back_tire, class_name: "Tire"
end

class Tire < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :motorcycle
  belongs_to :tire_brand
end

class TireBrand < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tires
  has_many :motorcycles, through: :tires
end
share|improve this answer
    
Bad design. You should have gone for the HABTM as meagar suggested. – TomDunning Aug 26 '12 at 22:03

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