Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I cannot find an proper example for the love of my life on how to do this or even if this is possible. Based on my pieced together understanding from fragments of exmaples, I have come up with the following structure

         var t = function()
         {
             this.nestedOne = function()
             {
                 this.nest = function()
                 {
                     alert("here");
                 }
             }
         } 
         t.nestedOne.nest();

However this is not working (obviously). I would greatly appreciate if someone could point me in the right direction!

share|improve this question
2  
what do you want to achieve? –  NicoSantangelo Aug 26 '12 at 17:56
    
I am trying to emulate nested classes as normally seen in programming languages. It makes OOP very organized and libraries much more organized. I know that JavaScript is not really built for complex OOP, but regardless it helps. JavaScript has a very unorthodox approach to functions but I can completely see why it is so powerful. –  Serguei Fedorov Aug 26 '12 at 18:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That is simply done with:

var t = {
    nestedOne: {
        nest: function() {
            alert('here');
        }
    }
};

Your code otherwise doesn't make sense. this inside function doesn't refer to the function itself, it refers to the object context that the function is invoked in. And you are not even invoking the functions in your code.

If I say obj.func() then this inside func will be obj for that call. So assigning this.asd = true will assign true to that object's "asd" property.

If you wanted to do a nested class, it looks very different:

ClassA = (function() {
   function ClassA() {

   }

   ClassA.prototype.method1 = function() {

   };

   function ClassB() {

   }

   ClassB.prototype.method1 = function() {

   };

   return ClassA;
}())

only ClassA can now make instances of ClassB. This should achieve same goals as nested classes in java.

share|improve this answer
    
You've provided an answer that shows him a cleaner way to do what people typically want, but he looks confused by the way functions work in general (the code inside hasn't been run yet) Do you want to include a blurb about it? –  Incognito Aug 26 '12 at 18:01
    
@Incognito sure –  Esailija Aug 26 '12 at 18:02
1  
@Incognito tbh, his understanding is so screwed I have no idea what to do here. –  Esailija Aug 26 '12 at 18:08
    
I am getting the hang of it. For someone coming out of C#/Java/C++ simply appending functions to other functions on the fly is a bit strange but is proving to be quite powerful. –  Serguei Fedorov Aug 26 '12 at 18:08
1  
@SergueiFedorov There is no advantage in appending functions to other functions. You are using the functions for their object nature (functions are exactly like objects, except they can be invoked with the () operator. You might even say they are callable objects.), so you might as well use plain objects which have niftier syntax. –  Esailija Aug 26 '12 at 18:13

A simple callback handler I wrote today as an example of how I do deep nesting. I apologize if it's not the bees knees when it comes to code style, it made the concept a little clearer for me.

    function test () {
      this.that = this;
      this.root = this;

      this.jCallback = new Array(new Array()); // 2d
      this.jCallbackCount = -1;
      this.str = "hello";


      // Callback handler... 
      this.command = {
        that : this, // let's keep a reference to who's above us on the food chain
        root : this.root, // takes us back to the main object

        // add : function() { var that = this; console.log(that.that.str); },
        add : function(targetFnc, newFunc) { 
            var that = this; 
            var home = that.that; // pretty much root but left in as an example of chain traversal.
            var root = this.root; // useful for climbing back up the function chain

            // console.log(that.that.str); 
            home.jCallbackCount++;
            // target, addon, active
            home.jCallback[home.jCallback.length] =  { 'targetFunc' : targetFnc,  'newFunc' : newFunc,  'active' : true, 'id': home.jCallbackCount};

            console.log('cbacklength: ' + home.jCallback.length);
            console.log('added callback targetFunction:[' + targetFnc + ']');

            return home.jCallbackCount; // if we want to delete this later...      
        },

        run : function(targetFnc) {
            var that = this; 
            var home = that.that;
            console.log('running callback check for: ' + targetFnc + '  There is : ' + (home.jCallbackCount + 1) + 'in queue.');
            console.log('length of callbacks is ' + home.jCallback.length);

            for(i=0;i < home.jCallback.length - 1;i++)
            {
              console.log('checking array for a matching callback [' + targetFnc + ']...');
              console.log('current item: ' + home.jCallback[i]['targetFunc'] );
              if( home.jCallback[i]['targetFunc'] == targetFnc )
              {
                 // matched! 
                home.jCallback[i]['newFunc']();
              }

                // console.log(that.that.jCallback[i].targetFunction);
            }
        }
      };

    }

    test.prototype = {
      say : function () {
        var that = this;
        console.log('inside');
        // that.command('doSay');
        that.command.run('doSay');
        console.log(that.str);
      }


    } // end proto



    // BEGIN TESTING **************************************************************************
    // BEGIN TESTING **************************************************************************
    // BEGIN TESTING **************************************************************************
    var testing = new test();


    testing.command.add('doSay', function () { console.log('213123123'); } );
    testing.command.add('doSay', function () { console.log('12sad31'); } );
    testing.command.add('doSay', function () { console.log('asdascccc'); } );


    testing.say();

live: http://jsfiddle.net/Ps5Uf/

  • note: to view console output, just open inspector in chrome and click on the "console" tab.
share|improve this answer

See http://jsfiddle.net/CstUH/

function t(){
     function f(){
         this.nest = function()
         {
             alert("here");
         }
     }
     this.nestedOne = new f();
 }
var myt=new t();
myt.nestedOne.nest()

Edit 1:

You can also use

new t().nestedOne.nest()

instead of

var myt=new t();
myt.nestedOne.nest()

(http://jsfiddle.net/CstUH/1/)

Edit 2:

Or even more condensed:

function t(){
    this.nestedOne = new function(){
        this.nest = function(){
            alert("here");
        }
    }
}
new t().nestedOne.nest()

http://jsfiddle.net/CstUH/2/

share|improve this answer

In JS functions are prime class objects, and you can access them directly in the code [i.e. without using reflection or so].

The code you put inside t body would be performed when actually executing t:

t();

You wrote t.nestedOne,nest(), but t has no nestedOne property - you should do like this:

var t = {

    nestedOne : {

        nest : function()
        {

            alert("here");

        }        

    }

};

t.nestedOne.nest();                ​

I advice you to have a trip on John Resig's Learning Advanced JavaScript tutorial, it was very enlightening for me.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.