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I have a data table of users and another table of user_ratings. It is a one to many relationship so the they are joined by UserId, the users table being the primary key and the user_ratings having the foreign key relationship. Each user_ratings has a column called rating_value and its filled with an int, negative or positive, and it gets summed together to be calculated as the user's rating. I want to be able to pull ratings for each user depending on the date for given ratings. Here is what I have so far with my linq statement, but I don't think it is right.

var profiles = from userprofs in Ent.UserProfiles
               join userratings in Ent.UserRatings on userprofs.UserId equals userratings.UserId
               where userratings.DateAdded >= drm.Start
               group userprofs by userprofs.UserId into g
               select new { ... };

Not really sure where to go from here, I'm not sure if I'm using the group correctly. I want to be able to iterate through this collection later to be able to display each user and his or her associated rating based of the sum of the user_ratings

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If all the information you wish to know about the ratings is aggregate information (sum, average, count, etc) then you can do the likes of this:

var profiles = from userprof in Ent.UserProfiles
  join userrating in Ent.UserRatings on userprofs.UserId equals userratings.UserId
  where userrating.DateAdded >= drm.Start
  group userrating by userprof into g
  select new {g.Key.UserID, g.Key.UserName, Count = g.Count(), Avg = g.Avg(r => r.RatingValue) };

Note that I changed the plurals to singular names, since we define linq queries in terms of each individual item (UserProfiles is plural, and userprof each item "in" it).

This has a nice straight-forward conversion to SQL:

SELECT up.userID, up.userName, COUNT(ur.*), AVG(ur.ratingValue)
FROM UserProfiles up JOIN UserRatings ur
ON up.userID = ur.userID
WHERE dateAdded > {whatever drm.Start is}
GROUP BY up.userID, up.userName

If we want to be able to get into individual ratings, this does not match too well with a single SQL query, we could do:

var profiles = from userprof in Ent.UserProfiles
  join userrating in Ent.UserRatings on userprofs.UserId equals userratings.UserId
  where userrating.DateAdded >= drm.Start
  group new{userrating.RatingValue, userrating.SomeThing} by new{userprof.UserID, userprof.UserName};

This would give us an IEnumerable<Grouping<{anonymous object}, {anonymous object}>> that we could iterate through, getting a new Key.UserID and Key.UserName on each iteration, and being able to iterate through that in turn getting item.RatingValue and item.SomeThing (that I added in for demonstration, if we want just the value it would be an IEnumerable<Grouping<{anonymous object}, int>>) like this:

foreach(var group in profiles)
{
  Console.WriteLine("The user is :" + group.Key.UserName + " (id: " + group.Key.UserID ")");
  foreach(var item in group)
  {
    Console.WriteLine(item.SomeThing + " was rated " + item.RatingValue);
  }
}

However, the problem with this, is that there isn't a nice single SQL query that this maps to. Linq will do its best, but that'll mean executing several queries, so you're better off helping it out:

var profiles = from item in (from userprof in Ent.UserProfiles
  join userrating in Ent.UserRatings on userprofs.UserId equals userratings.UserId
  where userrating.DateAdded >= drm.Start
  select new{userrating.RatingValue, userrating.SomeThing, userprof.UserID, userprof.UserName}).AsEnumerable()
  group new{item.RatingValue, item.SomeThing} by new{item.UserID, item.UserName}

This has the same output as before, but the translation into SQL allows for a single query to be made, with the rest of the work being done in memory. 99% of the time, dragging some work into memory like this makes things less efficient, but because the previous doesn't have a single SQL query it can map to, it's an exception.

share|improve this answer

If I understand your question:

from userprofs in Ent.UserProfiles
join userratings in Ent.UserRatings on userprofs.UserId equals userratings.UserId
where userratings.DateAdded >= drm.Start
group new{userprofs,userratings} by userprofs.UserId into g
select new { userId=g.Key, userRating=g.Sum(i=>i.userratings.rating_value) };

GroupBy returns an IEnumerable of IGrouping. An IGrouping is basically an IEnumerable with an extra Key property that contains the property that was used to make the grouping. If you Sum the rating_value of the grouping, you're there.

share|improve this answer
    
very close, but the i.rating_value is supposed to come from the userratings table and currently i tried what you had here, but it only gives me columns in userprofs – anthonypliu Aug 26 '12 at 20:20
    
if you create an anonymous object you can carry though to the select. see my edit. – spender Aug 26 '12 at 20:26
1  
I assume that you need to pull more than just the userId from your UserProfiles row, otherwise the join is redundant. You've already got a userId in your userratings column, – spender Aug 26 '12 at 20:32

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