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I would like serialize an object such that one of the fields will be named different based on the type of the field. For example:

public class Response {
    private Status status;
    private String error;
    private Object data;
        [ getters, setters ]
    }

Here, I would like the field "data" to be serialized to something like data.getClass.getName() instead of always having a field called "data" which contains a different type depending on the situation.

How might I achieve such a trick using Jackson?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Using a custom JsonSerializer.

public class Response {
  private String status;
  private String error;

  @JsonProperty("p")
  @JsonSerialize(using = CustomSerializer.class)
  private Object data;

  // ...
}

public class CustomSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Object> {
  public void serialize(Object value, JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
    jgen.writeStartObject();
    jgen.writeObjectField(value.getClass().getName(), value);
    jgen.writeEndObject();
  }
}

And then, suppose you want to serialize the following two objects:

public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
  ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
  Response r1 = new Response("Error", "Some error", 20);
  System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(r1));
  Response r2 = new Response("Error", "Some error", "some string");
  System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(r2));
}

The first one will print:

{"status":"Error","error":"Some error","p":{"java.lang.Integer":20}}

And the second one:

{"status":"Error","error":"Some error","p":{"java.lang.String":"some string"}}

I have used the name p for the wrapper object since it will merely serve as a placeholder. If you want to remove it, you'd have to write a custom serializer for the entire class, i.e., a JsonSerializer<Response>.

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my own solution.

@Data
@EqualsAndHashCode
@ToString
@JsonSerialize(using = ElementsListBean.CustomSerializer.class)
public class ElementsListBean<T> {

    public ElementsListBean()
    {
    }

    public ElementsListBean(final String fieldName, final List<T> elements)
    {
        this.fieldName = fieldName;
        this.elements = elements;
    }

    private String fieldName;

    private List<T> elements;

    public int length()
    {
        return (this.elements != null) ? this.elements.size() : 0;
    }

    private static class CustomSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Object> {
        public void serialize(Object value, JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException,
                JsonProcessingException
        {
            if (value instanceof ElementsListBean) {
                final ElementsListBean<?> o = (ElementsListBean<?>) value;
                jgen.writeStartObject();
                jgen.writeArrayFieldStart(o.getFieldName());
                for (Object e : o.getElements()) {
                    jgen.writeObject(e);
                }
                jgen.writeEndArray();
                jgen.writeNumberField("length", o.length());
                jgen.writeEndObject();
            }
        }
    }
}
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You can use the annotation JsonTypeInfo, which tell Jackson exactly that and you don't need to write a custom serializer. There's various way to include this information, but for your specific question you'd use As.WRAPPER_OBJECT and Id.CLASS. For example:

public static class Response {
    private Status status;
    private String error;
    @JsonTypeInfo(include = As.WRAPPER_OBJECT, use = Id.CLASS)
    private Object data;
}

This, however, will not work on primitive type, such as a String or Integer. You don't need that information for primitives anyways, since they are natively represented in JSON and Jackson knows how to handle them. The added bonus with using the annotation is that you get deserialization for free, if you ever need it. Here's an example:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    Response r1 = new Response("Status", "An error", "some data");
    Response r2 = new Response("Status", "An error", 10);
    Response r3 = new Response("Status", "An error", new MyClass("data"));
    System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(r1));
    System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(r2));
    System.out.println(mapper.writeValueAsString(r3));
}

@JsonAutoDetect(fieldVisibility=Visibility.ANY)
public static class MyClass{
    private String data;
    public MyClass(String data) {
        this.data = data;
    }
}

and the result:

{"status":"Status","error":"An error","data":"some data"}
{"status":"Status","error":"An error","data":10}
{"status":"Status","error":"An error","data":{"some.package.MyClass":{"data":"data"}}}
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