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I have a nested list that is similar to this and sorted on time ascending:

[[TIME, 'b', 0],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 10],
[TIME, 'b', 0],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 10],
[TIME, 'b', 0],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 1],
[TIME, 'b', 10]]

The third item in each list is either a 0, 1 or 10. 0 represents the start, 1 represents moving and 10 represents the finish. How can I split this into a further nested list so I would end up with a list of journeys similar to this:

[[[TIME, 'b', 0],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 10]],
[[TIME, 'b', 0],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 10]],
[[TIME, 'b', 0],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 10]]]
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4  
What have you tried that didn't work? –  Wooble Aug 26 '12 at 23:42
1  
How did you get this data? –  Blender Aug 26 '12 at 23:42
    
Ive been trying to get my head around these but have not been successful: stackoverflow.com/questions/5936771/… stackoverflow.com/questions/949098/… –  7wonders Aug 26 '12 at 23:47
    
That first link is a good one, and has several viable solutions. Maybe the simplest nontrivial one to start with is the list comprehension one: make a list of the indices which have elements with the last term equal to zero, and then make a new list slicing from each index to the next. –  DSM Aug 26 '12 at 23:54
    
You can just iterate over the list and add the elements to the sublist until you encounter an item with 10 (like shown in the first of your links). –  Felix Kling Aug 26 '12 at 23:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Probably there's a more pythonic way to do this, but this is functional, straight forward and should be easy to follow. biglist holds the initial data.

newlist = []
sublist = []
for i in biglist:
    sublist.append(i)
    if i[2] == 10:
        newlist.append(sublist)
        sublist = []

gives:

[[[TIME, 'b', 0],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 10]],
[[TIME, 'b', 0],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 10]],
[[TIME, 'b', 0],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 1],[TIME, 'b', 10]]]
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1  
Well, this was one of the first answers so it was the first I tried and it works perfectly. –  7wonders Aug 27 '12 at 0:06
    
It does seem to add an extra set of opening and closing [] though around the main list –  7wonders Aug 27 '12 at 0:15
1  
Upvoted because there's a lot to be said for straightforwardness. Even a non-Python programmer can look at that and figure out what's happening. More importantly, you'll be able to figure it out yourself when you come back next year to maintain it. –  Kirk Strauser Aug 27 '12 at 0:15
1  
But I fully agree with Kirk, I can actually read this, understand whats happening and learn from it. thikonom's answer below works perfectly too and if I could share my accept with him I would. –  7wonders Aug 27 '12 at 0:22
1  
@Levon - yep. newlist without surrounding [] works fine ;) –  7wonders Aug 27 '12 at 0:24
#x is your initial list
k, new_list = 0, []
for i,j in enumerate(x):
    if j[2] == 10:
        new_list.append(x[k:i+1])
        k = i+1
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Contrary to the other solution, here we test on whether the journey begins (d[2] == 0) instead of when it ends:

output = []
for d in data:
    if d[2] == 0:
        # Starting a new journey: we add a new list
        output.append([d])
    else:
        # Continuing a journey: we extend the last list
        output[-1].extend([d])

Of course, this gonna fail if the first journey never starts (you'll get an IndexError from the else statement)...

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It seems to miss the closing of the list on the 10's –  7wonders Aug 27 '12 at 0:11
    
As stated, you don't close the list on a 10, you start a new one (therefore, closing the previous one) on a 0. –  Pierre GM Aug 27 '12 at 0:14
    
I like this one, although I'd use .append(d) instead of .extend([d]). –  georg Aug 27 '12 at 8:16

The most obvious solution, if I have understood the question properly:

def iter_journeys(lst):
    for e in lst:
        act = e[2]

        if act == 0:
            journey = []

        journey.append(e)

        if act == 10:
            yield journey
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I'm sure there's a more efficient way of doing this, but here's a basic solution:

def create_journeys(paths):
  journeys = [[]]

  for path in paths:
    journeys[-1].append(path)

    if path[-1] == 10:
      journeys.append([])

  return journeys
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