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In my app I download a file from amazon's s3, which does not work unless the file name has no spaces in it. For example, one of the files is "HoleByNature". I would like to display this to the user as "Hole By Nature", even though the file name will still have no spaces in it.

I was thinking of writing a method to search through the string starting at the 1st character (not the 0th) and every time I find a capital letter I create a new string with a substring until that index with a space and a substring until the rest.

So I have two questions.

  1. If I use NSString's characterAtIndex, how do I know if that character is capital or not?
  2. Is there a better way to do this?

Thank you!

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Works for all unicode uppercase and titlecase letters

- (NSString*) spaceUppercase:(NSString*) text {
    NSCharacterSet *set = [NSCharacterSet uppercaseLetterCharacterSet];
    NSMutableString *result = [NSMutableString new];
    for (int i = 0; i < [text length]; i++) {
        unichar c = [text characterAtIndex:i];
        if ([set characterIsMember:c] && i!=0){
            [result appendFormat:@" %C",c];
        } else {
            [result appendFormat:@"%C",c];
        }
    }   
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You know you could just use the standard C function isupper, right? – Richard J. Ross III Aug 27 '12 at 0:20
    
@Jano i edited your answer -- feel free to roll back if you don't like it – justin Aug 27 '12 at 0:22
    
hmmm. this didn't work. I put this NSLog(@"space method try: %@",[self spaceUppercase:@"HoleByNature"]); and got this: 2012-08-26 21:18:56.391 <app name>[9492:707] space method try: HoleByNature – gg13 Aug 27 '12 at 1:19
    
it seems as if the characterIsMember is never returning YES. so it isn't finding a match? – gg13 Aug 27 '12 at 1:25
    
okay got it working using the isupper function. thanks Richard J. Ross III. – gg13 Aug 27 '12 at 1:27

I would not go to that approach because I know you can download files with spaces try this please when you construct the NSUrl object @"my_web_site_url\sub_domain\sub_folder\My%20File.txt

this will download "My File.txt" from the URL provided. so basically you can replace all spaces in the URL with %20

reference:

http://www.w3schools.com/tags/ref_urlencode.asp

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oh, I did notice that whenever I created URLs with paths that had spaces it would put the %20 wherever there was a space! I will definitely look into fixing this. thanks – gg13 Aug 27 '12 at 1:22

I had a similar issue, I had an array that had a list of labels I wanted to display within a UITableView, one label per row.

My issue was I parsed these labels out of an XML returned by a SOAP action and I had not idea over the format of the strings.

Firstly I implemented a method that just found the uppercase letters and stuck a space in front of it. This was great but some of these labels began with a capital letter and some where camel case (e.g. some strings where exampleLabel and others where ExampleLabel. So this meant the ones beginning with a capital had a space inserted in front of the string.

I overcame this by trimming whitespaces from the beggining and end of the string using NSString's stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet.

The next issue was any abbreviations used, such as "ID" or "PNR Status", where being displayed as "I D" and "P N R Status" as the capital letters where, and quite rightly, being picked up and a space inserted before it.

I overcame this issue by implementing a regex into my new method.

Here is my completed solution:

- (NSString *)formatLabel:(NSString *)label
{
    NSMutableString *str2 = [NSMutableString string];

    for (NSInteger i=0; i<label.length; i++){
        NSString *ch = [label substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(i, 1)];
        if ([ch rangeOfCharacterFromSet:[NSCharacterSet uppercaseLetterCharacterSet]].location != NSNotFound) {
            [str2 appendString:@" "];
        }
        [str2 appendString:ch];
    }
    NSString * formattedString = [str2 stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceCharacterSet]].capitalizedString;

    formattedString = [formattedString stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@"([A-Z]) (?![A-Z][a-z])" withString:@"$1" options:NSRegularExpressionSearch range:NSMakeRange(0, formattedString.length)];

    return formattedString;
}

I then simply call something like this, for example, that will return my nicely formatted string:

NSString * formattedLabel = [self formatLabel:@"PNRStatus"];
NSLog(@"Formatted Label: %@", formattedLabel);

Will output:

2013-10-10 10:44:39.888 Test Project[28296:a0b] Formatted Label: PNR Status

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Got it working with Jano's answer but using the isupper function as suggested by Richard J. Ross III.

- (NSString*) spaceUppercase:(NSString*) text 
{
    NSMutableString *result = [NSMutableString new];
    [result appendFormat:@"%C",[text characterAtIndex:0]];
    for (int i = 1; i < [text length]; i++) 
    {
         unichar c = [text characterAtIndex:i];
         if (isupper(c))
         {  
             [result appendFormat:@" %C",c];
         } 
         else 
         {
             [result appendFormat:@"%C",c];
         }
    }
    return result;
}
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